How to Use a CDN with Your OpenShift Application

“Content Delivery Networks (CDNs) can be used in concert with OpenShift to rev up the performance and availability of your websites. OpenShift’s auto-scaling feature equips web applications to handle increases in requests for site content, which may or may not be dynamically generated. CDNs, also known as Content Distribution Networks, can help to reduce some of the load on your OpenShift application servers and improve your site’s performance by caching static resources such as images and scripts and serving them up from the closest location to your users, from a global network of servers distributed across the internet. CDNs can also help to protect your web applications by detecting suspicious behavior and blocking offending traffic…”

https://www.openshift.com/blogs/how-to-use-a-cdn-with-your-openshift-application

The Environment Object Pattern in Go

“Since we are all obviously using the same language, the difference must lie in coding behavior. I’ve internalized a lot of testing methodology over the years, and I find some of the things work even better in Go that most other imperative languages. Let me share one of my core tricks today, which I will call the Environment Object pattern, and why Go makes it incrementally easier to use than other similar (imperative) environments…”

http://www.jerf.org/iri/post/2929

How to add a new package to RHSCL perl516 for RHEL

“The Red Hat Software Collection (RHSCL) perl516 contains only a part of the packages which are packaged in RHEL or Fedora. It is not hard to add a new package to RHSCL. The following steps show how to convert a conventional spec file into a Software Collection spec file. The SCL spec file can then be used in both the conventional package and the Software Collection. We will use perl-Pod-Perldoc is used for an example…”

How to add a new package to RHSCL perl516 for RHEL