Hypervisor-agnostic Docker Engine

“Hyper is a Hypervisor-agnostic Docker Engine that allows you to run Docker images on any hypervisor (KVM, Xen, etc.).

Technically speaking,

Hyper = Hypervisor + Kernel + Docker Image

By containing applications within separate VM instances and kernel spaces, Hyper is able to offer an excellent Hardware-enforced Isolation, which is much needed in multi-tenant environments.

Hyper also promises Immutable Infrastructure by eliminating the middle layer of Guest OS, along with the hassle to configure and manage them…”

https://hyper.sh/

Beej’s Guide to Network Programming

“Hey! Socket programming got you down? Is this stuff just a little too difficult to figure out from the man pages? You want to do cool Internet programming, but you don’t have time to wade through a gob of structs trying to figure out if you have to call bind() before you connect(), etc., etc.

Well, guess what! I’ve already done this nasty business, and I’m dying to share the information with everyone! You’ve come to the right place. This document should give the average competent C programmer the edge s/he needs to get a grip on this networking noise.

And check it out: I’ve finally caught up with the future (just in the nick of time, too!) and have updated the Guide for IPv6! Enjoy!…”

http://beej.us/guide/bgnet/

Beej’s Guide to Unix IPC

“You know what’s easy? fork() is easy. You can fork off new processes all day and have them deal with individual chunks of a problem in parallel. Of course, its easiest if the processes don’t have to communicate with one another while they’re running and can just sit there doing their own thing.

However, when you start fork()‘ing processes, you immediately start to think of the neat multi-user things you could do if the processes could talk to each other easily. So you try making a global array and then fork()‘ing to see if it is shared. (That is, see if both the child and parent process use the same array.) Soon, of course, you find that the child process has its own copy of the array and the parent is oblivious to whatever changes the child makes to it.

How do you get these guys to talk to one another, share data structures, and be generally amicable? This document discusses several methods of Interprocess Communication (IPC) that can accomplish this, some of which are better suited to certain tasks than others…”

http://beej.us/guide/bgipc/

The Docker Bench for Security

“The Docker Bench for Security is a script that checks for all the automatable tests included in the CIS Docker 1.6 Benchmark. We are releasing this as a follow-up to our Understanding Docker Security and Best Practices blog post.

We are making this available as an open-source utility so the Docker community can have an easy way to self-assess their hosts and docker containers against this benchmark…”

https://github.com/diogomonica/docker-bench-security

Job queues, message queues and other queues. Almost all of them in one place

“There are many queueing systems out there. Each one of them is different and was created for solving certain problems. This page tries to collect the libraries that are widely popular and have a successful record of running on (big) production systems.

The goal is to create a quality list of queues with a collection of articles, blog posts, slides, and videos about them. After reading the linked articles, you should have a good idea about: the pros and cons of each queue, a basic understanding of how the queue works, and what each queue is trying to achieve. Basically, you should have all the information you need to decide which queue will best fit your needs.

The whole site is open source and is updated quite frequently. If you find any mistakes or see something missing, feel free to post an issue or send a pull request. All contributions are welcome! Thanks…”

http://queues.io/