Deep Learning – An MIT Press book in preparation

FAQ

    • Can I get a PDF of this book?
      No, our contract with MIT Press forbids distribution of too easily copied electronic formats of the book. Google employees who would like a paper copy of the book can send Ian the name of the printer nearest their desk and he will send a print job to that printer containing as much of the book as you would like to read.
    • Why are you using HTML format for the drafts?
      This format is a sort of weak DRM. It’s intended to discourage unauthorized copying/editing of the book. Unfortunately, the conversion from PDF to HTML is not perfect, and some things like subscript expressions do not render correctly. If you have a suggestion for a better way of making the book available to a wide audience while preventing unauthorized copies, please let us know.
    • What is the best way to print the HTML format?
      Printing seems to work best printing directly from the browser, using Chrome.
    • When will the book come out?
      It’s difficult to predict. We’re doing our best to finish it as soon as possible. We expect to deliver the manuscript to reviews by January, but there will be some delay with review, typesetting, etc.
      Please contact us if you are interested in using the textbook for course materials in the short term, we may be able to find a way to accommodate you.

http://goodfeli.github.io/dlbook/

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Exploring Kotlin Standard Library

“Exploring the API docs and source code for a language’s standard library is usually illuminating and Kotlin is no different. In this series, I thought I’d look at some of the highlights of the Kotlin stdlib. In Part 1, I’ll be going over the default Kotlin namespace.

Both the API docs and the source code for the stdlib are available on github…”

http://jamie.mccrindle.org/2013/01/exploring-kotlin-standard-library-part-1.html
http://jamie.mccrindle.org/2013/01/exploring-kotlin-standard-library-part-2.html
http://jamie.mccrindle.org/2013/02/exploring-kotlin-standard-library-part-3.html

TurboLua

“Turbo is a framework for building event-driven, non-blocking RESTful web applications built on the top of Tornado web server

Pros:

  • LuaRocks install
  • Stable and well-tested
  • Active development
  • Excellent and extensive documentation
  • Nice templating system

Cons:

  • Does not support a variety of webservers
  • Supports only LuaJIT
  • I couldn’t find information on community
  • I couldn’t find information on databases supported…”

from:
http://lua.space/webdev/the-best-lua-web-frameworks

http://turbolua.org/
https://turbo.readthedocs.org/en/latest/index.html

Setup free SSL with Let’s Encrypt

“If you search Google for “free SSL”, there are many companies provide you a free trial SSL for only 90 days or less. After that, you will have to pay.

Now, thanks to Let’s Encrypt. It’s no longer needed. You can claim your own SSL certificate for free!

In this post, I will show you how to create your own free SSL certificate with Let’s Encrypt and setup it with nginx…”

http://huytd.github.io/2015/12/16/setup-free-ssl-with-lets-encrypt/index.html

Spotify Apollo

“Apollo is a set of Java libraries that we use at Spotify when writing micro-services. Apollo includes features such as an HTTP server and a URI routing system, making it trivial to implement RESTful services.

Open-source Apollo is still in development and only release candidates are available. The API and documentation might change prior to the stable 1.0.0 open source release…”

http://spotify.github.io/apollo/