An Introduction to Metatables

Hi folks, this post aims to offer a clear introduction to the topic of metatables in Lua for those who are not yet familiar with them. I originally wrote this for the forums of PICO-8, a ‘fantasy console’ with limitations inspired by classic 8-bit computers, which uses a modified flavour of Lua 5.2.

Without further ado, let’s go!

A table is a mapping of keys to values. They’re explained quite well in the PICO-8 manual and the Lua reference manual so I won’t go into more detail. In particular you should know that t.foo is just a nicer way of writing t["foo"] and also that t:foo() is a nicer way of calling the function t.foo(t)

A metatable is a table with some specially named properties defined inside. You apply a metatable to any other table to change the way that table behaves. This can be used to:

  1. define custom operations for your table (+, -, etc.)
  2. define what should happen when somebody tries to look up a key that doesn’t exist
  3. specify how your table should be converted to a string (e.g. for printing)
  4. change the way the garbage collector treats your table (e.g. tables with weak keys)

Point #2 is especially powerful because it allows you to set default values for missing properties, or specify a prototype object which contains methods shared by many tables.

You can attach a metatable to any other table using the setmetatable function.

All possible metatable events are explained on the lua-users wiki:
>>> list of metatable events <<<

which is, as far as I’m aware, the best reference for everything that metatables can be used for.

And that’s really all you need to know!

http://lua.space/general/intro-to-metatables

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