How both TCP and Ethernet checksums fail

At Twitter, a team had a unusual failure where corrupt data ended up in memcache. The root cause appears to have been a switch that was corrupting packets. Most packets were being dropped and the throughput was much lower than normal, but some were still making it through. The hypothesis is that occasionally the corrupt packets had valid TCP and Ethernet checksums. One “lucky” packet stored corrupt data in memcache. Even after the switch was replaced, the errors continued until the cache was cleared. [Update 2016-02-12: Root cause found: this also involved a kernel bug!]

I was very excited to hear about this error, because it is a real-world example of something I wrote about seven years ago: The TCP checksum is weak. However, the Ethernet CRC is strong, so how could a corrupt packet pass both checks? The answer is that the Ethernet CRC is recalculated by switches. If the switch corrupts the packet and it has the same TCP checksum, the hardware blindly recalculates a new, valid Ethernet CRC when it goes out.

As Mark Callaghan pointed out, this is a very rare scenario and you should never blame the network without strong evidence. However, it isn’t impossible and others have written about similar incidents. My conclusion is that if you are creating a new network protocol, please append a 4 byte CRC (I suggest CRC32C, implemented in hardware on recent Intel, AMD, and ARM CPUs). An alternative is to use an encryption protocol (e.g. TLS), since they include cryptographic hashes (which fixed a similar incident).

The rest of this article describes the details about how this is possible, mostly so I don’t forget them.

http://www.evanjones.ca/tcp-and-ethernet-checksums-fail.html

Advertisements