Pandas and Python Real World Project (GPS data)

“To celebrate my sub-30 minute finish on the manitou springs incline, I figured I’d drop some python and pandas knowledge while analyzing the data using beautifulsoup, pandas, python dateutil, python googlemaps, python geopy and the standard library.

I try to look at things in a non-trivial way and reflective of actual problems you encounter analyzing real world data. The data file is here https://gist.github.com/jrjames83/4de9d124e5f43a61be9cb2a… come code along!”

https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLImyDqSBQbdmicMPRW0Yo5QHbeOIwC765

Why everyone’s so excited about serverless computing

As part of the normal cycle of things, our most recent boom in enterprise technology development has slowed, which always leaves the industry breathless about whatever’s left that’s actually new. Witness, for example, the current mania over AI and machine learning.

I’ve had my fill of AI-washing, so the most interesting new area to me today is serverless computing, which hit the radar a couple of years ago when Amazon introduced AWS Lambda. The basic idea is that, finally, developers can build without worrying about physical or virtual servers or even containers. Instead, devs can simply assemble services from small building blocks of code called functions, and all that messy infrastructure stuff under the hood takes care of itself.

http://www.infoworld.com/article/3193393/cloud-computing/why-everyones-so-excited-about-serverless-computing.html

Turning Sublime Text Into a Lightweight Python IDE

A solid text editor is a developer’s best friend. You use it constantly and it becomes like a second pair of hands. The keyboard commands you use daily become so engrained in your muscle memory that you stop thinking about them entirely.

With Sublime Text, it’s possible to turn your text editor into the functional equivalent of a Python IDE. The best part is you don’t have to install an IDE to do it.

http://cewing.github.io/training.codefellows/assignments/day01/sublime_as_ide.html

Use all the Databases

Ever wanted to use a few different databases to build your app? Different types of databases are meant for different purposes, so it often makes sense to combine them. You might be hesitant due to the complexity of maintenance and coding, but it can be easy if you combine Compose and GraphQL: instead of writing a number of complex REST endpoints, each querying multiple databases, you set up a single GraphQL endpoint that provides whatever data the client wants using your simple data fetching functions.

This tutorial is meant for anyone who provides or fetches data, whether it’s a backend dev writing an API (in any language) or a frontend web or mobile dev fetching data from the server. We’ll learn about the GraphQL specification, set up a GraphQL server, and fetch data from five different data sources. The code is in Javascript, but you’ll still get a good idea of GraphQL without knowing the language.

https://www.compose.com/articles/use-all-the-databases-part-1/