Turning Sublime Text Into a Lightweight Python IDE

A solid text editor is a developer’s best friend. You use it constantly and it becomes like a second pair of hands. The keyboard commands you use daily become so engrained in your muscle memory that you stop thinking about them entirely.

With Sublime Text, it’s possible to turn your text editor into the functional equivalent of a Python IDE. The best part is you don’t have to install an IDE to do it.

http://cewing.github.io/training.codefellows/assignments/day01/sublime_as_ide.html

Use all the Databases

Ever wanted to use a few different databases to build your app? Different types of databases are meant for different purposes, so it often makes sense to combine them. You might be hesitant due to the complexity of maintenance and coding, but it can be easy if you combine Compose and GraphQL: instead of writing a number of complex REST endpoints, each querying multiple databases, you set up a single GraphQL endpoint that provides whatever data the client wants using your simple data fetching functions.

This tutorial is meant for anyone who provides or fetches data, whether it’s a backend dev writing an API (in any language) or a frontend web or mobile dev fetching data from the server. We’ll learn about the GraphQL specification, set up a GraphQL server, and fetch data from five different data sources. The code is in Javascript, but you’ll still get a good idea of GraphQL without knowing the language.

https://www.compose.com/articles/use-all-the-databases-part-1/

How to ship production-grade Go

Shipping a production-grade Go application is not the same as shipping a Go application. Remember, the big difference between your code and your code in production is all the ways it can fail; production-grade code is code that recognizes that difference, and prevents or plans for it.

So, how can you convert your Go to production-grade Go?

This article walks through five things to do to prime your code to run in production; the goal is for you to ship code that is robust, debuggable, and ready for the world.

https://www.oreilly.com/ideas/how-to-ship-production-grade-go

The self-healing letter of complaint

The self-healing letter of complaint

You’ve been wronged. The service was terrible. You went unseen, disrespected and abused. You didn’t get your money’s worth. The software is sloppy, the people were rude, the entire experience was lousy.

A letter to the organization is called for. At the very least, you’ll get an apology, some free samples, and maybe, just maybe, they’ll fix the problem for everyone who comes after you. How generous of you to dig in and share the vitriol.

Better put a sharp point on it, personalize it and make it sting.

Here’s the thing: Every angry word you write is only going to confirm the story you’re already telling yourself, the story that’s still making you miserable. The more spite you put into the note, the worse you’re going to feel. You’ll relive the event again and again. And, it’s pretty certain, if a human reads the note, they’ll now feel lousy too. They might go home and kick their dog, it’s that visceral.

To what end? Is it going to increase the chances that change happens?

Here’s a different tack, a selfish one that pays off for everyone involved:

Write the most positive note you can imagine. Write about how much the brand/service/government agency means to you. Let them know just how much you trust them, how much they’ve helped you in the past. Lay it on thick, that’s okay, it’ll remind you of why you care in the first place, and it will build bridges instead of tearing them down.

Then, say, “Here’s what didn’t work” or “But I have an important suggestion…”

And, without adding the hurt and anger that you feel, explain what went wrong. Explain it clearly, in a useful way, but give the reader the benefit of the doubt. Assume she knows that it didn’t make you happy, that it completely ruined your wedding, that you’re never ever going to return. Just leave that part out.

After all, if you didn’t care about them, you wouldn’t bother writing a letter, would you?

Two things will probably happen:

  1. When you hit ‘send’ you’re going to feel better about yourself and the process you just engaged in, and
  2. It’s more likely that the long-suffering recipient of your note will actually take action

We can change the stories we tell ourselves.

http://sethgodin.typepad.com/seths_blog/2017/05/the-self-healing-letter-of-complaint.html

Six programming paradigms that will change how you think about coding

Every now and then, I stumble across a programming language that does something so different that it changes how I think about coding. In this post, I want to share some of my favorite finds.

This is not your grandma’s “functional programming will change the world!” blog post: this list is much more esoteric. I’d wager most readers haven’t heard of the majority of the languages and paradigms below, so I hope you have as much fun learning about these new concepts as I did.

Note: I have only minimal experience with most of the languages below: I find the ideas behind them fascinating, but claim no expertise in them, so please point out any corrections and errors. Also, if you’ve found any new paradigms and ideas not covered here, please share them!

Update: this post hit the front page of r/programming and HN. Thank you for the great feedback! I’ve added some corrections below.

http://www.ybrikman.com/writing/2014/04/09/six-programming-paradigms-that-will/

Pandas & Seaborn – A guide to handle & visualize data elegantly

Up next you’ll find an overview of Pandas, a Python library which is old but gold and a must-know if you’re attempting to do any work with data while living in the Python world, and a glance of Seaborn, a Python library for making statistical visualizations. From our experience, they complement each other really well, and are worth learning together. We hope this post serves as a first guide for diving into them and kickstart your data handling & visualization journey.

https://tryolabs.com/blog/2017/03/16/pandas-seaborn-a-guide-to-handle-visualize-data-elegantly/

Getting Started with Headless Chrome

TL;DR

Headless Chrome is a way to run the Chrome browser in a headless environment. Essentially, running Chrome without chrome! It brings all modern web platform features provided by Chromium and the Blink rendering engine to the command line.

Why is that useful?

A headless browser is a great tool for automated testing and server environments where you don’t need a visible UI shell. For example, you may want to run some tests against a real web page, create a PDF of it, or just inspect how the browser renders an URL.

https://developers.google.com/web/updates/2017/04/headless-chrome