Serverless Framework example for Golang and Lambda

Everyone, the day has come.

AWS Lambda is finally. Compatible. With Golang. đź––

Here’s how you can start using Go with the Serverless Framework RIGHT NOW and deploy Lambdas to your heart’s content.

https://serverless.com/blog/framework-example-golang-lambda-support/

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REACT, REDUX AND JAVASCRIPT ARCHITECTURE

The content of this article was originally presented to the Squiz Front-End Engineering group.

Whether you use them or not, React and Redux are important. They have changed the way we think about structuring front-end web applications. They can be very powerful. But they are not magic. JavaScript code does not automatically become better just because it uses React. It is easy to write horrible React code, just like it’s easy to write horrible vanilla JavaScript. So, why is React important then? The thing is, understanding how to write React and Redux code is one thing. Understanding why you’d want to use React and Redux is another matter entirely. Once you understand the why of React and Redux, then modern JavaScript starts to make more sense. This is true whatever framework you’re using. Whether it’s React, Vue, Ember, Angular, Web Components, or something else entirely. React and Redux have had a huge impact on how we organise front-end code.1

So, this article might seem long-winded. I do want to show you how to write actual React and Redux code. But it will take a while to get there. And there is a reason. Redux is not terribly complicated. But with Redux (like React), understanding why you’d want to use it is much more interesting than how it works. So, though it might take us a little while to get to Redux, I think the journey will be worth it.

https://jrsinclair.com/articles/2018/react-redux-javascript-architecture/

How to use AWS Fargate and Lambda for long-running processes in a Serverless app

AWS dropped so many serverless announcements at re:Invent, the community is still scrambling to make sense of them all. This post is all about AWS Fargate.

In this article, I will show you how to create an end-to-end serverless application that extracts thumbnails from video files. But, oh no, processing video files is a long-running process! Whatever will we do?

This is where Fargate comes in.

TL;DR A Docker container does the processing -> The container extracts the thumbnail and uploads the image to an S3 bucket -> The container is managed by AWS Fargate. All functionality is triggered from AWS Lambda functions and contained within a serverless application written with the Serverless Framework.

https://serverless.com/blog/serverless-application-for-long-running-process-fargate-lambda/

AWS AppSync – GraphQL as a Service

Day two at re:Invent 2017 was incredibly packed, crowded, and exciting. My favorite announcement so far is the new AWS AppSync, as it aligns with one of the most promising (yet somehow controversial) design principles adopted by the serverless community: GraphQL.

If you are not familiar with GraphQL, we recently explained how to write GraphQL Apps using AWS Lambda, and hosted a webinar about the Love Story between Serverless and GraphQL. Here’s a quick look at what you need to know about AWS AppSync.

https://cloudacademy.com/blog/aws-appsync-graphql-as-a-service/

What I learned in 2017 Writing Go

A little over a year ago, I joined Cloud Foundry to work on Loggregator, Cloud Foundry’s application logging component. Its core concern is best-effort log delivery without pushing back on upstream writers. Loggregator is written entirely in Go.

After spending more than a thousand hours working with Go in a non-trivial code base, I still admire the language and enjoy using it. Nonetheless, our team struggled with a number of problems, many of which seem unique to Go. What follows is a list of the most salient problems.

https://www.commandercoriander.net/blog/2017/12/31/writing-go/