11 Javascript Machine Learning Libraries To Use In Your App

iOrca whales trained through neural networks, that’s the future.

“ Wait, what?? That’s a horrible idea! “

Were the exact words of our leading NLP researcher when I first talked to her about this concept. Maybe she’s right, but it’s also definitely a very interesting concept which is getting more attention in the Javascript community lately.

During the past year our team is building Bit which makes it simpler to build software using components. As part of our work, we develop ML and NLP algorithms to better understand how code is written, organized and used.

While naturally most of this work is done in languages like python, Bit lives in the Javascript ecosystem with its great front and back ends communities…

https://blog.bitsrc.io/11-javascript-machine-learning-libraries-to-use-in-your-app-c49772cca46c

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Introducing TensorFlow.js: Machine Learning in Javascript

We’re excited to introduce TensorFlow.js, an open-source library you can use to define, train, and run machine learning models entirely in the browser, using Javascript and a high-level layers API. If you’re a Javascript developer who’s new to ML, TensorFlow.js is a great way to begin learning. Or, if you’re a ML developer who’s new to Javascript, read on to learn more about new opportunities for in-browser ML. In this post, we’ll give you a quick overview of TensorFlow.js, and getting started resources you can use to try it out.

https://medium.com/tensorflow/introducing-tensorflow-js-machine-learning-in-javascript-bf3eab376db

Evaluating Message Brokers: Kafka vs. Kinesis vs. SQS

In last couple of years, we have observed evolution of several message brokers and queuing services which are all fast, reliable and scalable. While the list is long, in this blog, I will limit the discussion to SQS, Kinesis and Kafka. Simple Queuing Service (SQS) is a fully managed and scalable queuing service on AWS. Kinesis is another service offered by AWS that makes it easy to load and analyze streaming data and also provides the ability to build custom streaming data applications for special requirements. Apache Kafka is a fast, scalable, durable, and fault-tolerant publish-subscribe messaging system which is often used in place of traditional message brokers like JMS and AMQP because of its characteristics like higher throughput, reliability and replication.

While making decisions about which messaging system is right for you, it is important to understand not only the technical differences but also the implications of operational costs both in terms of running them at scale as well as monitoring them. In this blog, I will touch upon our experiences and learning at OpsClarity, based on our evaluation of messaging systems and our migration from SQS to Kafka.

https://www.opsclarity.com/evaluating-message-brokers-kafka-vs-kinesis-vs-sqs/

Using React, Firebase, and Ant Design to Quickly Prototype Web Applications

In this guide I will show you how to use Firebase, React, and Ant Design as building blocks to build functional, high-fidelity web applications. To illustrate this, we’ll go through an example of building a todo list app.

These days, there are so many tools available for web development that it can feel paralyzing. Which server should you use? What front-end framework are you going to choose? Usually, the recommended approach is to use the technologies that you know best. Generally, this means choosing a battle-tested database like PostgreSQL or MySQL, choosing a MVC framework for your webserver (my favourite is Adonis), and either using that framework’s rendering engine or using a client-side javascript library like ReactJS or AngularJS.

Using the above approach is productive – especially if you have good boilerplate to get you started – but what if you want to build something quickly with nearly zero setup time? Sometimes a mockup doesn’t convey enough information to a client; sometimes you want to build out an MVP super fast for a new product.

The source code for this example is available here. If you’re looking for a good IDE to use during this guide, I highly recommend Visual Studio Code.

https://nrempel.com/guides/react-firebase-ant-design/

Amazon DynamoDB Continuous Backups and Point-In-Time Recovery (PITR)

The Amazon DynamoDB team is back with another useful feature hot on the heels of encryption at rest. At AWS re:Invent 2017 we launched global tables and on-demand backup and restore of your DynamoDB tables and today we’re launching continuous backups with point-in-time recovery (PITR).

You can enable continuous backups with a single click in the AWS Management Console, a simple API call, or with the AWS Command Line Interface (CLI). DynamoDB can back up your data with per-second granularity and restore to any single second from the time PITR was enabled up to the prior 35 days. We built this feature to protect against accidental writes or deletes. If a developer runs a script against production instead of staging or if someone fat-fingers a DeleteItem call, PITR has you covered. We also built it for the scenarios you can’t normally predict. You can still keep your on-demand backups for as long as needed for archival purposes but PITR works as additional insurance against accidental loss of data. Let’s see how this works.

https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/new-amazon-dynamodb-continuous-backups-and-point-in-time-recovery-pitr/

The Ultimate Guide To Speech Recognition With Python

Understanding deep learning through neuron deletion

Deep neural networks are composed of many individual neurons, which combine in complex and counterintuitive ways to solve a wide range of challenging tasks. This complexity grants neural networks their power but also earns them their reputation as confusing and opaque black boxes. 

Understanding how deep neural networks function is critical for explaining their decisions and enabling us to build more powerful systems. For instance, imagine the difficulty of trying to build a clock without understanding how individual gears fit together. One approach to understanding neural networks, both in neuroscience and deep learning, is to investigate the role of individual neurons, especially those which are easily interpretable.

Our investigation into the importance of single directions for generalisation, soon to appear at the Sixth International Conference on Learning Representations (ICLR), uses an approach inspired by decades of experimental neuroscience — exploring the impact of damage — to determine: how important are small groups of neurons in deep neural networks? Are more easily interpretable neurons also more important to the network’s computation?

https://deepmind.com/blog/understanding-deep-learning-through-neuron-deletion/