Stanford CS231N lectures – Convolutional Neural Networks for Visual Recognition

Computer Vision has become ubiquitous in our society, with applications in search, image understanding, apps, mapping, medicine, drones, and self-driving cars. Core to many of these applications are visual recognition tasks such as image classification, localization and detection. Recent developments in neural network (aka “deep learning”) approaches have greatly advanced the performance of these state-of-the-art visual recognition systems. This course is a deep dive into details of the deep learning architectures with a focus on learning end-to-end models for these tasks, particularly image classification. During the 10-week course, students will learn to implement, train and debug their own neural networks and gain a detailed understanding of cutting-edge research in computer vision. The final assignment will involve training a multi-million parameter convolutional neural network and applying it on the largest image classification dataset (ImageNet). We will focus on teaching how to set up the problem of image recognition, the learning algorithms (e.g. backpropagation), practical engineering tricks for training and fine-tuning the networks and guide the students through hands-on assignments and a final course project. Much of the background and materials of this course will be drawn from the ImageNet Challenge.

Advertisements

Understanding word vectors

… for, like, actual poets. By Allison Parrish

In this tutorial, I’m going to show you how word vectors work. This tutorial assumes a good amount of Python knowledge, but even if you’re not a Python expert, you should be able to follow along and make small changes to the examples without too much trouble.

This is a “Jupyter Notebook,” which consists of text and “cells” of code. After you’ve loaded the notebook, you can execute the code in a cell by highlighting it and hitting Ctrl+Enter. In general, you need to execute the cells from top to bottom, but you can usually run a cell more than once without messing anything up. Experiment!

https://gist.github.com/aparrish/2f562e3737544cf29aaf1af30362f469