A Concrete Introduction to Probability (using Python)

This notebook covers the basics of probability theory, with Python 3 implementations. (You should have some background in probability and Python.)

In 1814, Pierre-Simon Laplace wrote:

Probability … is thus simply a fraction whose numerator is the number of favorable cases and whose denominator is the number of all the cases possible … when nothing leads us to expect that any one of these cases should occur more than any other.

Laplace

Pierre-Simon Laplace
1814

Laplace really nailed it, way back then! If you want to untangle a probability problem, all you have to do is be methodical about defining exactly what the cases are, and then careful in counting the number of favorable and total cases. We’ll start being methodical by defining some vocabulary:

  • Experiment: An occurrence with an uncertain outcome that we can observe.
    For example, rolling a die.
  • Outcome: The result of an experiment; one particular state of the world. What Laplace calls a “case.”
    For example: 4.
  • Sample Space: The set of all possible outcomes for the experiment.
    For example, {1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6}.
  • Event: A subset of possible outcomes that together have some property we are interested in.
    For example, the event “even die roll” is the set of outcomes {2, 4, 6}.
  • Probability: As Laplace said, the probability of an event with respect to a sample space is the number of favorable cases (outcomes from the sample space that are in the event) divided by the total number of cases in the sample space. (This assumes that all outcomes in the sample space are equally likely.) Since it is a ratio, probability will always be a number between 0 (representing an impossible event) and 1 (representing a certain event).
    For example, the probability of an even die roll is 3/6 = 1/2.

This notebook will develop all these concepts; I also have a second part that covers paradoxes in Probability Theory.

http://nbviewer.jupyter.org/url/norvig.com/ipython/Probability.ipynb

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How to create a REST API with pre-written Serverless Components

You might have already heard about our new project, Serverless Components. Our goal was to encapsulate common functionality into so-called “components”, which could then be easily re-used, extended and shared with other developers and other serverless applications.

In this post, I’m going to show you how to compose a fully-fledged, REST API-powered application, all by using several pre-built components from the component registry.

https://serverless.com/blog/how-create-rest-api-serverless-components/

Use Amazon DynamoDB Accelerator (DAX) from AWS Lambda to increase performance while reducing costs

Using Amazon DynamoDB Accelerator (DAX) from AWS Lambda has several benefits for serverless applications that also use Amazon DynamoDB. DAX can improve the response time of your application by dramatically reducing read latency, as compared to using DynamoDB. Using DAX can also lower the cost of DynamoDB by reducing the amount of provisioned read throughput needed for read-heavy applications. For serverless applications, DAX provides an additional benefit: Lower latency results in shorter Lambda execution times, which means lower costs.

Connecting to a DAX cluster from Lambda functions requires some special configuration. In this post, I show an example URL-shortening application based on the AWS Serverless Application Model (AWS SAM). The application uses Amazon API Gateway, Lambda, DynamoDB, DAX, and AWS CloudFormation to demonstrate how to access DAX from Lambda.

https://aws.amazon.com/pt/blogs/database/how-to-increase-performance-while-reducing-costs-by-using-amazon-dynamodb-accelerator-dax-and-aws-lambda/

A serverless MapReduce framework written for AWS Lambda

Corral is a MapReduce framework designed to be deployed to serverless platforms, like AWS Lambda. It presents a lightweight alternative to Hadoop MapReduce. Much of the design philosophy was inspired by Yelp’s mrjob — corral retains mrjob’s ease-of-use while gaining the type safety and speed of Go.

Corral’s runtime model consists of stateless, transient executors controlled by a central driver. Currently, the best environment for deployment is AWS Lambda, but corral is modular enough that support for other serverless platforms can be added as support for Go in cloud functions improves.

Corral is best suited for data-intensive but computationally inexpensive tasks, such as ETL jobs.

More details about corral’s internals can be found in this blog post.

https://github.com/bcongdon/corral

Ballerina – Cloud Native Programming Language

Ballerina makes it easy to create resilient services that integrate and orchestrate transactions across distributed endpoints.

CODE with a statically-typed, interaction-centric programming language where microservices, APIs, and streams are first-class constructs. Use your preferred IDE and CI/CD tools. Discover, consume, and share packages that integrate endpoints with Ballerina Central.

BUILD binaries, containers, and Kubernetes artifacts. Deploy as chaos-ready services on cloud and serverless infrastructure.

INTEGRATE distributed endpoints with simple syntax for resiliency, circuit breakers, transactions, and events.

https://ballerina.io/

A Neural Network in 11 lines of Python

Summary: I learn best with toy code that I can play with. This tutorial teaches backpropagation via a very simple toy example, a short python implementation.

Edit: Some folks have asked about a followup article, and I’m planning to write one. I’ll tweet it out when it’s complete at @iamtrask. Feel free to follow if you’d be interested in reading it and thanks for all the feedback!

http://iamtrask.github.io/2015/07/12/basic-python-network/?hn2=1