Event Injection: A New Serverless Attack Vector

As more and more developers and companies adopt serverless architecture, the likelihood of hackers exploiting these applications increases dramatically. The shared security model of cloud providers extends much further with serverless offerings, but application security is still the developer’s responsibility. There has been a lot of hype about #NoOPS with serverless environments 🤥, which is simply not true 😡. Many traditional applications are frontended with WAFs (web application firewalls), RASPs (runtime application self-protection), EPPs (endpoint protection platforms) and WSGs (web security gateways) that inspect incoming and outgoing traffic. These extra layers of protection can save developers from themselves when making common programming mistakes that would otherwise leave their applications vulnerable. With serverless, these all go away. 😳

Serverless makes it easy to deploy a function to the cloud and not think about the infrastructure it’s running on. While certainly convenient, this leaves many developers with a false sense of security. By relying too heavily on the cloud provider, and not coding defensively, developers can significantly reduce their overall security posture. As with any type of software, there are a myriad of attacks possible against serverless infrastructures. However, unlike traditional web applications, serverless architectures are “event-driven”. This means they can be triggered by a number of different sources with multiple formats and encodings, rendering WAFs useless and opening up a completely new attack vector…

https://www.jeremydaly.com/event-injection-a-new-serverless-attack-vector/

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