Why We Decided to Rewrite Uber’s Driver App

This article is the first in a series covering how Uber’s mobile engineering team developed the newest version of our driver app, codenamed Carbon, a core component of our ridesharing business. Among other new features, the app lets our population of over three million driver-partners find fares, get directions, and track their earnings. We began designing the new app in conjunction with feedback from our driver-partners in 2017, and began rolling it out for production in September 2018.

In early 2017, Uber made the decision to rewrite our driver app. This is the sort of decision that Joel Spolsky, the CEO of StackOverflow, once called “the single worst strategic mistake that any software company can make.”

Rewrites are incredibly risky, resource-intensive, and take a long time to deliver a tangible benefit for users. For this particular rewrite, hundreds of engineers contributed in some capacity, not to mention designers, product managers, data scientists, operations, legal, and marketing. In practice, our rewrite took a year and a half to implement and roll out globally.

Our case is an extreme example of a question that engineers in all organizations face. If you are an engineer working for a start-up and are considering rewriting some code or a feature, you might ask, “How much of our runway are we burning?” If you are working on a small team in a large organization, you might ask, “Are these changes worth the features we are not building?” A good engineer and a good team will look at these broader questions before they take on the challenge of a rewrite.

So, while the rewrite process involved a number of important technical decisions (to be covered in future articles), the decision to rewrite involved a combination of both technical considerations and broader business concerns. While these questions are hard to answer, good answers to the above questions will help you justify a rewrite to your organization or team.

Ultimately, these decisions do not get made in a vacuum. We did not make the decision to rewrite the app as a result of theoretical architectural thinking (“our code might be better, if only we…”), but rather as a result of an intensive, three-month research process that involved hundreds of pages of documentation and broad, cross-organizational buy-in. In the following sections, we discuss our decision to rewrite the Uber driver app and what we discovered as a result of this process.

https://eng.uber.com/rewrite-uber-carbon-app/

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