How to publish and use AWS Lambda Layers with the Serverless Framework

AWS re:Invent is in full swing, with AWS announcing a slew of new features. Most notably, we’re pretty excited about AWS Lambda’s support for Layers.

Layers allows you to include additional files or data for your functions. This could be binaries such as FFmpeg or ImageMagick, or it could be difficult-to-package dependencies, such as NumPy for Python. These layers are added to your function’s zip file when published. In a way, they are comparable to EC2 AMIs, but for functions.

The killer feature of Lambda’s Layers is that they can be shared between Lambda functions, accounts, and even publicly!

There are two aspects to using Lambda Layers:

  1. Publishing a layer that can be used by other functions
  2. Using a layer in your function when you publish a new function version.

We’re excited to say that the Serverless Framework has day 1 support for both publishing and using Lambda Layers with your functions with Version 1.34.0!

See how you can publish and use Lambda Layers with the Serverless Framework below…

https://serverless.com/blog/publish-aws-lambda-layers-serverless-framework/

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AWS Toolkits for PyCharm, IntelliJ (Preview), and Visual Studio Code (Preview)

Software developers have their own preferred tools. Some use powerful editors, others Integrated Development Environments (IDEs) that are tailored for specific languages and platforms. In 2014 I created my first AWS Lambdafunction using the editor in the Lambda console. Now, you can choose from a rich set of tools to build and deploy serverless applications. For example, the editor in the Lambda console has been greatly enhanced last year when AWS Cloud9 was released. For .NET applications, you can use the AWS Toolkit for Visual Studio and AWS Tools for Visual Studio Team Services.

AWS Toolkits for PyCharm, IntelliJ, and Visual Studio Code

Today, we are announcing the general availability of the AWS Toolkit for PyCharm. We are also announcing the developer preview of the AWS Toolkits for IntelliJ and Visual Studio Code, which are under active development in GitHub. These open source toolkits will enable you to easily develop serverless applications, including a full create, step-through debug, and deploy experience in the IDE and language of your choice, be it Python, Java, Node.js, or .NET.

For example, using the AWS Toolkit for PyCharm you can:

These toolkits are distributed under the open source Apache License, Version 2.0.

https://aws.amazon.com/pt/blogs/aws/new-aws-toolkits-for-pycharm-intellij-preview-and-visual-studio-code-preview/

New for AWS Lambda – Use Any Programming Language and Share Common Components

I remember the excitement when AWS Lambda was announced in 2014Four years on, customers are using Lambdafunctions for many different use cases. For example, iRobot is using AWS Lambda to provide compute services for their Roomba robotic vacuum cleaners, Fannie Mae to run Monte Carlo simulations for millions of mortgages, Bustle to serve billions of requests for their digital content.

Today, we are introducing two new features that are going to make serverless development even easier:

  • Lambda Layers, a way to centrally manage code and data that is shared across multiple functions.
  • Lambda Runtime API, a simple interface to use any programming language, or a specific language version, for developing your functions.

These two features can be used together: runtimes can be shared as layers so that developers can pick them up and use their favorite programming language when authoring Lambda functions.

https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/new-for-aws-lambda-use-any-programming-language-and-share-common-components/

https://github.com/awslabs/aws-lambda-cpp

Amazon DynamoDB On-Demand – No Capacity Planning and Pay-Per-Request Pricing

Just a few years ago, creating a database that could support your business at any scale while providing consistent low latency was a daunting task. That changed for me in 2012 while reading Werner Vogels’ blog post announcing Amazon DynamoDB (it was a few months before I joined AWS). DynamoDB was built on the principles in the original Dynamo paper that Amazon published in 2007. Over the years, lots of new features have been introduced to further simplify how AWS customers use databases. You can now create fully managed, multi-region, multi-master database tables with features such as encryption at rest, point-in-time recovery, in-memory caching, and a 99.99% uptime service level agreement (SLA).

https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/amazon-dynamodb-on-demand-no-capacity-planning-and-pay-per-request-pricing/

Amazon DynamoDB Transactions

Over the years, customers have used Amazon DynamoDB for lots of different use cases, from building microservices and mobile backends to implementing gaming and Internet of Things (IoT) solutions. For example, Capital One uses DynamoDB to reduce the latency of their mobile applications by moving their mainframe transactions to a serverless architecture. Tinder migrated user data to DynamoDB with zero downtime, to get the scalability they need to support their global user base.

Developers sometimes need to implement business logic that requires multiple, all-or-nothing operations across one or more tables. This requirement can add unnecessary complexity to their implementation. Today, we are making these use cases easier to build on DynamoDB with native support for transactions.

https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/new-amazon-dynamodb-transactions/

How Streak built a graph database on Cloud Spanner to wrangle billions of emails

Streak makes a CRM add-on for Gmail, and recently adopted Cloud Spanner to take advantage of its scalability and SQL capabilities to implement a graph data model. Read on to learn about their decision, what they love about the system, and the ways in which it still needs work.

https://cloud.google.com/blog/products/databases/how-streak-built-a-graph-database-on-cloud-spanner-to-wrangle-billions-of-emails