Introducing AWS Lambda Destinations

Today we’re announcing AWS Lambda Destinations for asynchronous invocations. This is a feature that provides visibility into Lambda function invocations and routes the execution results to AWS services, simplifying event-driven applications and reducing code complexity.

Asynchronous invocations

When a function is invoked asynchronously, Lambda sends the event to an internal queue. A separate process reads events from the queue and executes your Lambda function. When the event is added to the queue, Lambda previously only returned a 2xx status code to confirm that the queue has received this event. There was no additional information to confirm whether the event had been processed successfully.

A common event-driven microservices architectural pattern is to use a queue or message bus for communication. This helps with resilience and scalability. Lambda asynchronous invocations can put an event or message on Amazon Simple Notification Service (SNS), Amazon Simple Queue Service (SQS), or Amazon EventBridge for further processing. Previously, you needed to write the SQS/SNS/EventBridge handling code within your Lambda function and manage retries and failures yourself.

With Destinations, you can route asynchronous function results as an execution record to a destination resource without writing additional code. An execution record contains details about the request and response in JSON format including version, timestamp, request context, request payload, response context, and response payload. For each execution status such as Success or Failure you can choose one of four destinations: another Lambda function, SNS, SQS, or EventBridge. Lambda can also be configured to route different execution results to different destinations.

https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/introducing-aws-lambda-destinations/