Manual Memory Management in Go using jemalloc

Dgraph Labs has been a user of the Go language since our inception in 2015. Five years and 200K lines of Go code later, we’re happy to report that we are still convinced Go was and remains the right choice. Our excitement for Go has gone beyond building systems, and has led us to even write scripts in Go that would typically be written in Bash or Python. We find that using Go has helped us build a codebase that is clean, readable, maintainable and – most importantly – efficient and concurrent.

However, there’s one area of concern that we have had since the early days: memory management. We have nothing against the Go garbage collector, but while it offers a convenience to developers, it has the same issue that other memory garbage collectors do: it simply cannot compete with the efficiency of manual memory management.

When you manage memory manually, the memory usage is lower, predictable and allows bursts of memory allocation to not cause crazy spikes in memory usage. For Dgraph using Go memory, all of those have been a problem1. In fact, Dgraph running out of memory is a very common complaint we hear from our users.

Languages like Rust have been gaining ground partly because it allows safe manual memory management. We can completely empathize with that.

In our experience, doing manual memory allocation and chasing potential memory leaks takes less effort than trying to optimize memory usage in a language with garbage collection2. Manual memory management is well worth the trouble when building database systems that are capable of virtually unlimited scalability.

Our love of Go and our need to avoid Go GC led us to find novel ways to do manual memory management in Go. Of course, most Go users will never need to do manual memory management; and we would recommend against it unless you need it. And when you do need it, you’ll know.

In this post, I’ll share what we have learned at Dgraph Labs from our exploration of manual memory management, and explain how we manually manage memory in Go.

https://dgraph.io/blog/post/manual-memory-management-golang-jemalloc/