Up  – Deploy serverless apps in seconds

Last year I wrote Blueprints for Up, describing how most of the building blocks are available to create a great serverless experience on AWS with minimal effort. This post talks about the initial alpha release of Up.

The TL;DR was to run your “vanilla” HTTP server inside of Lambda on a unprivileged port, and relay requests to it, so that you don’t have to write code specifically targeting Lambda or other platforms.

Roughly a month ago I decided to start working on it over at apex/up, and wrote the first small serverless sample application tj/gh-polls for live SVG GitHub user polls. It worked well and costs less than $1/month to serve millions of polls, so I thought I’d go ahead with Up and see if I can offer open-source and commercial variants.

The long-term goal is to provide a “Bring your own Heroku” of sorts, supporting many platforms. While PaaS is nothing new, the serverless ecosystem is making this kind of program increasingly trivial, however AWS and others often suffer in terms of UX due to the flexibility they provide. Up aims to abstract platform internals away and provide a user-friendly solution.

https://medium.com/@tjholowaychuk/up-b3db1ca930ee

Firebase Cloud Functions with Typescript and Webpack

Recently Firebase launched Cloud Functions–a way to run your code on their servers. It’s a game changer! Now you can run code that you trust to manage many parts of your Firebase Project.

The downside of Cloud Functions is that it only supports NodeJs, forcing you to use Javascript. Fortunately, we can mitigate some of the issues that Javascript brings with Typescript.

In this post we’ll build Firebase Cloud Functions using Typescript and Webpack.

 
https://medium.com/netscape/firebase-cloud-functions-with-typescript-and-webpack-7781c882a05b

Tensorflow tutorials and best practices

  1. Tensorflow Basics
  2. Understanding static and dynamic shapes
  3. Broadcasting the good and the ugly
  4. Understanding order of execution and control dependencies
  5. Control flow operations: conditionals and loops
  6. Prototyping kernels and advanced visualization with Python ops
  7. Multi-GPU processing with data parallelism
  8. Building a neural network framework with learn API
  9. Tensorflow Cookbook

https://github.com/vahidk/EffectiveTensorflow

One codebase, two apps and 1278 lines of code

DevFest Florida is one of the many DevFests that GDG groups around the world are putting on this fall. GDG Sun Coast, the group I help organize is one of the groups that are involved in organizing the event in Florida, DevFest Florida. This year we’ll be at Disney World on November 11th and at the moment you can score a ticket for $80 if you follow our twitter feed.

We have a decent website but folks like to have an app to check the schedule. One of the best apps I’ve seen is the Windy City DevCon Android app. It’s an open source project written by Ryan Harter. It’s slick in that it clearly shows all the sessions for a specific time block. It shows speaker details. It allows users to favorite their sessions to keep track of what they’re interested in. It allows attendees to rate the sessions. It’s even written in Kotlin. So what’s not to like? Well the ONLY problem with this app is that it’s only available for Android.

Cut to I/O 2017 this year. Emily Fortuna and Emily Shack demo’d Flutter. They used Flutter to write one code base that ran natively on iOS and Android and then hooked it into Firebase to create a modern “Hello World”: a chat app. My mind was blown. I wanted to do something with Flutter and Dart and I figured I could use the great design of the Windy City DevCon app and duplicate it with Flutter.

https://traversoft.com/blog/2017/08/08/conference-app-flutter/