Face recognition with OpenCV, Python, and deep learning

In today’s blog post you are going to learn how to perform face recognition in both images and video streams using:

  • OpenCV
  • Python
  • Deep learning

As we’ll see, the deep learning-based facial embeddings we’ll be using here today are both (1) highly accurate and (2) capable of being executed in real-time.

To learn more about face recognition with OpenCV, Python, and deep learning, just keep reading!

https://www.pyimagesearch.com/2018/06/18/face-recognition-with-opencv-python-and-deep-learning/

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Itertools in Python 3, By Example

It has been called a “gem” and “pretty much the coolest thing ever,” and if you have not heard of it, then you are missing out on one of the greatest corners of the Python 3 standard library: itertools.

A handful of excellent resources exist for learning what functions are available in the itertools module. The docs themselves are a great place to start. So is this post.

https://realpython.com/python-itertools/

A Concrete Introduction to Probability (using Python)

This notebook covers the basics of probability theory, with Python 3 implementations. (You should have some background in probability and Python.)

In 1814, Pierre-Simon Laplace wrote:

Probability … is thus simply a fraction whose numerator is the number of favorable cases and whose denominator is the number of all the cases possible … when nothing leads us to expect that any one of these cases should occur more than any other.

Laplace

Pierre-Simon Laplace
1814

Laplace really nailed it, way back then! If you want to untangle a probability problem, all you have to do is be methodical about defining exactly what the cases are, and then careful in counting the number of favorable and total cases. We’ll start being methodical by defining some vocabulary:

  • Experiment: An occurrence with an uncertain outcome that we can observe.
    For example, rolling a die.
  • Outcome: The result of an experiment; one particular state of the world. What Laplace calls a “case.”
    For example: 4.
  • Sample Space: The set of all possible outcomes for the experiment.
    For example, {1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6}.
  • Event: A subset of possible outcomes that together have some property we are interested in.
    For example, the event “even die roll” is the set of outcomes {2, 4, 6}.
  • Probability: As Laplace said, the probability of an event with respect to a sample space is the number of favorable cases (outcomes from the sample space that are in the event) divided by the total number of cases in the sample space. (This assumes that all outcomes in the sample space are equally likely.) Since it is a ratio, probability will always be a number between 0 (representing an impossible event) and 1 (representing a certain event).
    For example, the probability of an even die roll is 3/6 = 1/2.

This notebook will develop all these concepts; I also have a second part that covers paradoxes in Probability Theory.

http://nbviewer.jupyter.org/url/norvig.com/ipython/Probability.ipynb

A Neural Network in 11 lines of Python

Summary: I learn best with toy code that I can play with. This tutorial teaches backpropagation via a very simple toy example, a short python implementation.

Edit: Some folks have asked about a followup article, and I’m planning to write one. I’ll tweet it out when it’s complete at @iamtrask. Feel free to follow if you’d be interested in reading it and thanks for all the feedback!

http://iamtrask.github.io/2015/07/12/basic-python-network/?hn2=1

Blockchain Explained in 7 Python Functions

I think for many people out there, Blockchain is this phenomenon, which is hard to get your head around. I started watching videos and reading articles, but for me personally, it wasn’t until I wrote my own simple Blockchain, that I truly understood what it is and the potential applications for it.

The way I think about blockchain is it is an encrypted database that is public. If you were Amazon and you wanted to use the technology to track your stock levels, would using Blockchain make sense? Probably not, since your customers won’t want to expend their resources verifying your blockchain, since they state on their website, ‘Only 1 left!’, anyway.

I’ll leave you to think about future applications. So without further ado, lets set up our 7 functions!

https://www.kdnuggets.com/2018/04/blockchain-explained-7-python-functions.html

Text Data Preprocessing: A Walkthrough in Python

In a pair of previous posts, we first discussed a framework for approaching textual data science tasks, and followed that up with a discussion on a general approach to preprocessing text data. This post will serve as a practical walkthrough of a text data preprocessing task using some common Python tools.

Data preprocessing
Preprocessing, in the context of the textual data science framework.Our goal is to go from what we will describe as a chunk of text (not to be confused with text chunking), a lengthy, unprocessed single string, and end up with a list (or several lists) of cleaned tokens that would be useful for further text mining and/or natural language processing tasks.

https://www.kdnuggets.com/2018/03/text-data-preprocessing-walkthrough-python.html

Notes on structured concurrency, or: Go statement considered harmful

Every concurrency API needs a way to run code concurrently. Here’s some examples of what that looks like using different APIs:

go myfunc(); // Golang
pthread_create(&thread_id, NULL, &myfunc); /* C with POSIX threads */
spawn(modulename, myfuncname, []) % Erlang
threading.Thread(target=myfunc).start() # Python with threads
asyncio.create_task(myfunc()) # Python with asyncio

There are lots of variations in the notation and terminology, but the semantics are the same: these all arrange for myfunc to start running concurrently to the rest of the program, and then return immediately so that the parent can do other things.

Another option is to use callbacks:

QObject::connect(&emitter, SIGNAL(event()), &receiver, SLOT(myfunc())) // C++ with Qt
g_signal_connect(emitter, "event", myfunc, NULL) /* C with GObject */
document.getElementById("myid").onclick = myfunc; // Javascript
promise.then(myfunc, errorhandler) // Javascript with Promises
deferred.addCallback(myfunc) # Python with Twisted
future.add_done_callback(myfunc) # Python with asyncio

Again, the notation varies, but these all accomplish the same thing: they arrange that from now on, if and when a certain event occurs, then myfunc will run. Then once they’ve set that up, they immediately return so the caller can do other things. (Sometimes callbacks get dressed up with fancy helpers like promise combinators, or Twisted-style protocols/transports, but the core idea is the same.)

And… that’s it. Take any real-world, general-purpose concurrency API, and you’ll probably find that it falls into one or the other of those buckets (or sometimes both, like asyncio).

https://vorpus.org/blog/notes-on-structured-concurrency-or-go-statement-considered-harmful/