Android 8.0 Oreo, thoroughly reviewed

Android 8.0 Oreo is the 26th version of the world’s most popular operating system. This year, Google’s mobile-and-everything-else OS hit two billion monthly active users—and that’s just counting phones and tablets. What can all those users expect from the new version? In an interview with Ars earlier this year, Android’s VP of engineering Dave Burke said that the 8.0 release would be about “foundation and fundamentals.” His team was guided by a single question: “What are we doing to Android to make sure Android is in a great place in the next 5 to 10 years?”

Nabisco produced a limited run of Android-themed Oreos for the launch event.
Nabisco produced a limited run of Android-themed Oreos for the launch event.
Oreo

Take a closer look at Oreo and you really can see the focus on fundamentals. Google is revamping the notification system with a new layout, new controls, and a new color scheme. It’s taking responsibility for Android security with a Google-branded security solution. App background processing has been reined in, hopefully providing better battery life and more consistent performance. There’s even been some work done on Android’s perpetual update problem, with Project Treble allowing for easier update development and streaming updates allowing for easier installation by users. And, as with every release, more parts of Android get more modularized, with emojis and GPU driver updates now available without an OS update.Like its partnership with Nestlé for Android 4.4 “KitKat,” Google is taking its alphabetical snack-themed codenames to the extreme with 8.0. This time Nabisco is sharing its “Oreo” brand with Google. (We’ve yet to hear about any kind of monetary arrangement for this sort of thing). Google’s Eclipse-themed launch party was complete with custom Oreo cookies featuring an Android robot design and green filling.

Two billion users is a huge number, but with Android 8.0, Google shows that it still isn’t satisfied. A new initiative called “Android Go” targets the developing world, where cheap devices and limited access to data and power require taking a different look at how some parts of Android function.

Oreo will also serve as the base for three new Android form factors. It will be built into cars as “Android Automotive,” where Google works with car OEMs to integrate Android. Android 8.0 will also be the base OS for “Android Things,” an “Internet of things” (IoT) version of the OS designed to easily manage on embedded devices. Finally, Google’s virtual reality “Daydream” group will also launch a new form factor with Oreo: standalone VR headsets.

So, coming soon to your phone, your tablet, your watch, your TV, your car, your “things,” and your VR headset—it’s Android 8.0 Oreo. Let’s dive in.

Table of Contents

https://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2017/09/android-8-0-oreo-thoroughly-reviewed/

How to make complex requests simple with RxJava in Kotlin

It is a common problem in Android development when your API is not sending you exactly the same data, what you want to show in your views, so you need to implement more complex requests. Possibly your app needs to make multiple requests, that wait for each other, or call multiple requests after the previous one finished. Sometimes you even need to combine these two approaches. This can be challenging in plain Java and will often result in unreadable code, what is also painful to test.

Today I’m going to show you in a simple example how this can be achieved in a clean way using RxJava. The example is written in Kotlin, what makes the code more concise and easy to read. If you are completely new to RxJava or Kotlin, I suggest you catch up on the basics. There are some great resources here as well.

https://blog.mindorks.com/how-to-make-complex-requests-simple-with-rxjava-in-kotlin-ccec004c5d10

One codebase, two apps and 1278 lines of code

DevFest Florida is one of the many DevFests that GDG groups around the world are putting on this fall. GDG Sun Coast, the group I help organize is one of the groups that are involved in organizing the event in Florida, DevFest Florida. This year we’ll be at Disney World on November 11th and at the moment you can score a ticket for $80 if you follow our twitter feed.

We have a decent website but folks like to have an app to check the schedule. One of the best apps I’ve seen is the Windy City DevCon Android app. It’s an open source project written by Ryan Harter. It’s slick in that it clearly shows all the sessions for a specific time block. It shows speaker details. It allows users to favorite their sessions to keep track of what they’re interested in. It allows attendees to rate the sessions. It’s even written in Kotlin. So what’s not to like? Well the ONLY problem with this app is that it’s only available for Android.

Cut to I/O 2017 this year. Emily Fortuna and Emily Shack demo’d Flutter. They used Flutter to write one code base that ran natively on iOS and Android and then hooked it into Firebase to create a modern “Hello World”: a chat app. My mind was blown. I wanted to do something with Flutter and Dart and I figured I could use the great design of the Windy City DevCon app and duplicate it with Flutter.

https://traversoft.com/blog/2017/08/08/conference-app-flutter/

Should I learn Kotlin or stick to Java?

Google announced Kotlin as an official language for Android development. Some famous developer companies, like square, started using kotlin as their production language long before the official announcement was made.

Now one of the most trending questions juggling around the minds of many experts and most beginners is should I learn kotlin or stick to java? Here’s some point should be made based on three stages of a developers like really really beginner, ninja apprentice, totally ninja.

https://blog.mindorks.com/should-i-learn-kotlin-or-stick-to-java-3a73c3580ac3

What do 17 Google Developers Experts for Android think about Kotlin?

Google has already expressed several times that they don’t have anything against Kotlin, and that they’re not preventing us from using it while the compiler still generates valid bytecode.

But many people is still waiting for an official support, something that could never happen.

While we wait until that moment though, I thought it would be nice to know what the Google Developers Experts for Android think about it.

If you hadn’t heard about it, Google Developers Experts (GDEs) is a program that recognizes outstanding developers the effort to be a reference on the field they are involved in.

I contacted some of these Android Experts (the list is huge!), and I got answers from 17 of them. Thanks a lot for being so nice and taking your time to answer!

I’ve just asked them to tell us a bit about them, and what they think about Kotlin. The answers are obviously unmodified, so you will find voices for and against (or not so for) the language.

I really hope this helps you form an idea of how Kotlin is being a game changer, and that, at least, is a language to take into account if you are an Android developer.

Without further delay, here it is the opinion of our GDEs in no particular order:…

https://antonioleiva.com/google-kotlin/

Litho: A declarative UI framework for Android

Litho is a declarative framework for building efficient user interfaces (UI) on Android. It allows you to write highly-optimized Android views through a simple functional API based on Java annotations. It was primarily built to implement complex scrollable UIs based on RecyclerView.

With Litho, you build your UI in terms of components instead of interacting directly with traditional Android views. A component is essentially a function that takes immutable inputs, called props, and returns a component hierarchy describing your user interface.

@LayoutSpec
class HelloComponentSpec {

  @OnCreateLayout
  static ComponentLayout onCreateLayout(
      ComponentContext c,
      @Prop String name) {

    return Text.create(c)
        .text("Hello, " + name)
        .textSizeRes(R.dimen.my_text_size)
        .textColor(Color.BLACK)
        .withLayout()
        .paddingDip(ALL, 10)
        .build();
  }
}

You simply declare what you want to display and Litho takes care of rendering it in the most efficient way by computing layout in a background thread, automatically flattening your view hierarchy, and incrementally rendering complex components.

Have a look at our Tutorial for a step-by-step guide on using Litho in your app. You can also read the quick start guide on how to write and use your own Litho components.

http://fblitho.com/