Using artificial intelligence to detect product defects with AWS Step Functions

Factories that produce a high volume of inventory must ensure that defective products are not shipped. This is often accomplished with human workers on the assembly line or through computer vision.

You can build an application that uses a custom image classification model to detect and report back any defects in a product, then takes appropriate action. This method provides a powerful, scalable, and simple solution for quality control. It uses Amazon S3Amazon SQSAWS LambdaAWS Step Functions, and Amazon SageMaker.

To simulate a production scenario, the model is trained using an example dataset containing images of an open-source printed circuit board, with defects and without. An accompanying AWS Serverless Application Repository application deploys the Step Functions workflow for handling image classification and notifications.

https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/using-artificial-intelligence-to-detect-product-defects-with-aws-step-functions/

Introducing AWS Lambda Destinations

Today we’re announcing AWS Lambda Destinations for asynchronous invocations. This is a feature that provides visibility into Lambda function invocations and routes the execution results to AWS services, simplifying event-driven applications and reducing code complexity.

Asynchronous invocations

When a function is invoked asynchronously, Lambda sends the event to an internal queue. A separate process reads events from the queue and executes your Lambda function. When the event is added to the queue, Lambda previously only returned a 2xx status code to confirm that the queue has received this event. There was no additional information to confirm whether the event had been processed successfully.

A common event-driven microservices architectural pattern is to use a queue or message bus for communication. This helps with resilience and scalability. Lambda asynchronous invocations can put an event or message on Amazon Simple Notification Service (SNS), Amazon Simple Queue Service (SQS), or Amazon EventBridge for further processing. Previously, you needed to write the SQS/SNS/EventBridge handling code within your Lambda function and manage retries and failures yourself.

With Destinations, you can route asynchronous function results as an execution record to a destination resource without writing additional code. An execution record contains details about the request and response in JSON format including version, timestamp, request context, request payload, response context, and response payload. For each execution status such as Success or Failure you can choose one of four destinations: another Lambda function, SNS, SQS, or EventBridge. Lambda can also be configured to route different execution results to different destinations.

https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/introducing-aws-lambda-destinations/

AWS Step Functions Adds Support for Workflow Execution Events

AWS Step Functions now supports workflow execution events, which make it faster and easier to build and monitor event-driven, serverless workflows. Execution event notifications can be automatically delivered when a workflow starts or completes through CloudWatch Events, reaching targets like AWS Lambda, Amazon SNS, Amazon Kinesis, or AWS Step Functions for automated response to the event.

You can enable CloudWatch Event notifications for Step Functions in minutes. Customers simply have to identify the state machine, what event changes are of interest, and the targets for the notification.

AWS Step Functions allows you to add resilient workflow automation to your applications. The steps of your workflow can exist anywhere, including in AWS Lambda functions, on Amazon EC2, or on-premises. AWS Step Functions is also integrated with Amazon ECS, AWS Fargate, Amazon DynamoDB, Amazon SNS, Amazon SQS, AWS Batch, AWS Glue, and Amazon SageMaker. You can connect and coordinate all these services in minutes—without writing code

To learn more:

https://aws.amazon.com/pt/about-aws/whats-new/2019/05/aws-step-functions-adds-support-for-workflow-execution-events/

A Guide to S3 Batch on AWS

AWS just announced the release of S3 Batch Operations. This is a hotly-anticpated release that was originally announced at re:Invent 2018. With S3 Batch, you can run tasks on existing S3 objects. This will make it much easier to run previously difficult tasks like retagging S3 objects, copying objects to another bucket, or processing large numbers of objects in bulk.

In this post, we’ll do a deep dive into S3 Batch. You will learn when, why, and how to use S3 Batch. First, we’ll do an overview of the key elements involved in an S3 Batch job. Then, we’ll walkthrough an example by doing sentiment analysis on a group of existing objects with AWS Lambda and Amazon Comprehend.

https://www.alexdebrie.com/posts/s3-batch/

Use Lambda Layers To Post To Slack

I have tried a few different ways of reporting Lambda errors to Slack, but haven’t found a reusable solution that gave all of the information I desired. I decided to solve that problem by creating my own Lambda layer. This solution doesn’t highlight the use of error logging, but is dynamic enough that you can just pass an error message into the layer.

For this to be useful to you, make sure you are familiar with the following:
1. AWS Lambda
2. Node JS
3. NPM
4. Slack

https://medium.com/@cplankey/use-lambda-layers-to-post-to-slack-513782db3d82?hss_channel=tw-920289756919074817

Building Serverless Pipelines with Amazon CloudWatch Events

Events and serverless go together like baked beans and barbecue. The serverless mindset says to focus on code and configuration that provide business value. It turns out that much of the time, this means working with events: structured data corresponding to things that happen in the outside world. Rather than maintaining long-running server tasks that chew up resources while polling, I can create serverless applications that do work only in response to event triggers.

I have lots of options when working with events in AWS: Amazon Kinesis Data Streams, Amazon Simple Notification Service (SNS), Amazon Simple Queue Service (SQS), and more, depending on my requirements. Lately, I’ve been using a service more often that has the word ‘event’ right in the name: Amazon CloudWatch Events.

https://aws.amazon.com/pt/blogs/aws/building-serverless-pipelines-with-amazon-cloudwatch-events/

WHEN TO USE LAMBDA LAYERS

AWS introduced Lambda Layers at re:invent 2018 as a way to share code and data between functions within and across different accounts. It’s a useful tool and something many AWS customers have been asking for. However, since we already have numerous ways of sharing code, including package managers such as NPM, when should we use Layers instead?

In this post, we will look at how Lambda Layers works, the problem it solves and the new challenges it introduces. And we will finish off with some recommendations on when to use it.

https://lumigo.io/blog/lambda-layers-when-to-use-it/