Error Handling in AWS Lambda With Wrappers

We have been using web frameworks to develop web applications since long before serverless came around, and middlewares are stable in these web frameworks. Express.js, for instance, lets you create middlewares at several stages of the request handling pipeline, and even ships with a few common middlewares out of the box.

As our code moves into Lambda functions and we move away from these web frameworks, are middlewares still relevant? If so, how might they look in this new world of serverless?

In this post, we’ll revisit the idea of middlewares, their role in application development with AWS Lambda, and how we can use middlewares to enforce consistent error handling across all of our Lambda functions.

https://epsagon.com/blog/enforce-consistent-error-handling-in-aws-lambda-with-wrappers/

How to add file upload features to your website with AWS Lambda and S3

The mechanism for uploading files from a browser has been around since the early days of the Internet. In the server-full environment it’s very easy to use Django, Express, or any other popular framework. It’s not an exciting topic — until you experience the scaling problem.

Imagine this scenario — you have an application that uploads files. All is well until the site suddenly gains popularity. Instead of handling a gigabyte of uploads a month, usage grows to 100Gb an hour for the month leading up to tax day. Afterwards, the usage drops back down again for another year. This is exactly the problem we had to solve.

File uploading at scale gobbles up your resources — network bandwidth, CPU, storage. All this data is ingested through your web server(s), which you then have to scale — if you’re lucky this means auto-scaling in AWS, but if you’re not in the cloud you’ll also have to contend with the physical network bottleneck issues.

You can also face some difficult race conditions if your server fails in the middle of handling the uploaded file. Did the file make to its end destination? What was the state of the processing? It can be very hard to replay the steps to failure or know the state of transactions when the server is overloaded.

Fortunately, this particular problem turns out to be a great use case for serverless — as you can eliminate the scaling issues entirely. For mobile and web apps with unpredictable demand, you can simply allow the application to upload the file directly to S3. This has the added benefit of enabling an https endpoint for the upload, which is critical for keeping the file’s contents secure in transit.

All this sounds great — but how does this work in practice when the server is no longer there to do the authentication and intermediary legwork?

https://read.acloud.guru/how-to-add-file-upload-features-to-your-website-with-aws-lambda-and-s3-48bbe9b83eaa

Throttling Third-Party API calls with AWS Lambda

In the serverless world, we often get the impression that our applications can scale without limits. With the right design (and enough money), this is theoretically possible. But in reality, many components of our serverless applications DO have limits. Whether these are physical limits, like network throughput or CPU capacity, or soft limits, like AWS Account Limits or third-party API quotas, our serverless applications still need to be able to handle periods of high load. And more importantly, our end users should experience minimal, if any, negative effects when we reach these thresholds.

There are many ways to add resiliency to our serverless applications, but this post is going to focus on dealing specifically with quotas in third-party APIs. We’ll look at how we can use a combination of SQS, CloudWatch Events, and Lambda functions to implement a precisely controlled throttling system. We’ll also discuss how you can implement (almost) guaranteed ordering, state management (for multi-tiered quotas), and how to plan for failure. Let’s get started!

https://www.jeremydaly.com/throttling-third-party-api-calls-with-aws-lambda/

Multi-region serverless backend 

In 2018, I wrote a series of blog posts on building a multi-region, active-active, serverless architecture on AWS [1, 2, 3 and 4]. The solution was built using DynamoDB Global Tables, Lambda, the regional API Gateway feature, and Route 53 routing policies. It worked well as a resiliency pattern and as a disaster recovery (DR) strategy . But there was an issue.

https://medium.com/@adhorn/multi-region-serverless-backend-reloaded-1b887bc615c0

AWS Lambda And Python Boto3: To Bundle Or Not Bundle With Your Function

In the engineering world a lot of our practices, even at times our best practices, are often just common wisdom passed along from one person to another. With Stack Overflow, Slack, and even Twitter, it’s easier today than it ever was for ideas to propagate. However, a lot of what passes for common wisdom is really just widely held opinions. And nothing says common wisdom has to be right. Where I ran into this distinction recently was with Python’s Boto3 modules (boto3 and botocore) and whether or not I should bundle them with my AWS Lambda deployment artifact.

Recently I found out the common wisdom I’ve adhered to was wrong. (Yes, someone on the internet was wrong.) Like many people, I use the Boto3 modules provided by the AWS Lambda runtime. However after talking with several folks at AWS I discovered, you should not be using the AWS Lambda runtime’s boto3 and botocore module. And you shouldn’t use botocore’s vendored version of the requests module whether no matter what instance of botocore you are using. I’ll explain how I found this out and explore why more than just me have probably gotten this best practice wrong.

https://www.serverlessops.io/blog/aws-lambda-and-python-boto3-bundling

Using API Gateway WebSockets with the Serverless Framework

As we approach the end of 2018, I’m incredibly excited to announce that we at Serverless have a small gift for you: You can work with Amazon API Gateway WebSockets in your Serverless Framework applications starting right now.

But before we dive into the how-to, there are some interesting caveats that I want you to be aware of.

First, this is not supported in AWS CloudFormation just yet, though AWS has publicly stated it will be early next year! As such, we decided to implement our initial support as a plugin and keep it out of core until the official AWS CloudFormation support is added.

Second, the configuration syntax should be pretty close, but we make no promises that anything implemented with this will carry forward after core support. And once core support is added with AWS CloudFormation, you will need to recreate your API Gateway resources managed by CloudFormation. This means that any clients using your WebSocket application would need to be repointed, or other DNS would have needed to be in place, to facilitate the cutover.

I recommend you check out my original post for a basic understanding of how WebSockets works at a technical level via connections and callbacks to the Amazon API Gateway connections management API.

With all that out of the way, play with our new presents!

https://serverless.com/blog/api-gateway-websockets-example/

AWS Lambda in a VPC Will Soon be Much Faster

One of the most common pains for users of AWS Lambda is cold starts. Cold starts add unwanted delays to Lambda invocations, and in cases where a Lambda is used inside of a Virtual Private Cloud (VPC), the latency can be as high as several seconds. This practically negates the speed benefits of Lambda functions.

Fortunately, the Lambda team announced at AWS re:Invent 2018 that they are changing the architecture of Lambdas running in a VPC in order to reduce this latency and make Lambdas start much faster.

https://www.nuweba.com/AWS-Lambda-in-a-VPC-will-soon-be-faster

Anomaly detection on Amazon DynamoDB Streams using the Amazon SageMaker Random Cut Forest algorithm

Have you considered introducing anomaly detection technology to your business? Anomaly detection is a technique used to identify rare items, events, or observations which raise suspicion by differing significantly from the majority of the data you are analyzing.  The applications of anomaly detection are wide-ranging including the detection of abnormal purchases or cyber intrusions in banking, spotting a malignant tumor in an MRI scan, identifying fraudulent insurance claims, finding unusual machine behavior in manufacturing, and even detecting strange patterns in network traffic that could signal an intrusion.

There are many commercial products to do this, but you can easily implement an anomaly detection system by using Amazon SageMaker, AWS Glue, and AWS Lambda. Amazon SageMaker is a fully-managed platform to help you quickly build, train, and deploy machine learning models at any scale. AWS Glue is a fully-managed ETL service that makes it easy for you to prepare your data/model for analytics. AWS Lambda is a well-known a serverless real-time platform. Using these services, your model can be automatically updated with new data, and the new model can be used to alert for anomalies in real time with better accuracy.

In this blog post I’ll describe how you can use AWS Glue to prepare your data and train an anomaly detection model using Amazon SageMaker. For this exercise, I’ll store a sample of the NAB NYC Taxi data in Amazon DynamoDB to be streamed in real time using an AWS Lambda function.

The solution that I describe provides the following benefits:

  • You can make the best use of existing resources for anomaly detection. For example, if you have been using Amazon DynamoDB Streams for disaster recovery (DR) or other purposes, you can use the data in that stream for anomaly detection. In addition, stand-by storage usually has low utilization. The data in low awareness can be used for training data.
  • You can automatically retrain the model with new data on a regular basis with no user intervention.
  • You can make it easy to use the Random Cut Forest built-in Amazon SageMaker algorithm. Amazon SageMaker offers flexible distributed training options that adjust to your specific workflows in a secure and scalable environment.

https://aws.amazon.com/pt/blogs/machine-learning/anomaly-detection-on-amazon-dynamodb-streams-using-the-amazon-sagemaker-random-cut-forest-algorithm/

How to Minimize AWS Lambda Cold Starts

Serverless architecture is the new kid on the block, and according to a recent surveyby Serverless, Inc., a vast majority of developers will start using it by the end of the year. The serverless paradigm involves running code in the cloud without managing any servers, allowing you to build business logic and create value without ever thinking about the infrastructure or underlying software. Essentially, it lets you focus on your code.

Serverless does not only cover AWS Lambda and other FaaS providers, but basically everything you can use to run code, host files, and store images and data. This means that you, as an engineer, don’t need to manage, scale, or operate any servers whatsoever. And here’s the icing on the cake: you only pay for the time your code is running!

Although serverless offers many benefits, there are still some pitfalls, such as latency. In this article, we’ll discuss how to minimize latency in AWS Lambda. This dreaded phenomenon is caused by cold starts, which are, by definition, slower initial responses from your serverless APIs.

Before we begin, let’s dig deeper into what FaaS is and how it works.

https://epsagon.com/blog/how-to-minimize-aws-lambda-cold-starts/