How to Build Your Own Blockchain

How to Build Your Own Blockchain Part 1 — Creating, Storing, Syncing, Displaying, Mining, and Proving Work

I can actually look up how long I have by logging into my Coinbase account, looking at the history of the Bitcoin wallet, and seeing this transaction I got back in 2012 after signing up for Coinbase. Bitcoin was trading at about $6.50 per. If I still had that 0.1 BTC, that’d be worth over $500 at the time of this writing. In case people are wondering, I ended up selling that when a Bitcoin was worth $2000. So I only made $200 out of it rather than the $550 now. Should have held on…

https://bigishdata.com/2017/10/17/write-your-own-blockchain-part-1-creating-storing-syncing-displaying-mining-and-proving-work/

How to Build Your Own Blockchain Part 2 — Syncing Chains From Different Nodes

Welcome to part 2 of the JackBlockChain, where I write some code to introduce the ability for different nodes to communicate.

Initially my goal was to write about nodes syncing up and talking with each other, along with mining and broadcasting their winning blocks to other nodes.   In the end, I realized that the amount of code and explanation to accomplish all of that was way too big for one post. Because of this, I decided to make part 2 only about nodes beginning the process of talking for the future…

https://bigishdata.com/2017/10/27/build-your-own-blockchain-part-2-syncing-chains-from-different-nodes/

How to Build Your Own Blockchain Part 3 — Writing Nodes that Mine and Talk

Hello all and welcome to Part 3 of building the JackBlockChain — JBC. Quick past intro, in Part 1 I coded and went over the top level math and requirements for a single node to mine its own blockchain; I create new blocks that have the valid information, save them to a folder, and then start mining a new block. Part 2 covered having multiple nodes and them having the ability to sync. If node 1 was doing the mining on its own and node 2 wanted to grab node 1’s blockchain, it can now do so…

https://bigishdata.com/2017/11/02/build-your-own-blockchain-part-3-writing-nodes-that-mine/

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How to Create a Private Ethereum Blockchain from Ground-up?

Ethereum is a decentralized platform that runs smart contracts, applications that run exactly as programmed without possibility of downtime, censorship, fraud or third party interference. In this blog post I will take you through all the steps required in setting up a fully functioning private ethereum blockchain, inside your local network — which includes:

  • Setting up a private blockchain with ethereum using geth.
  • Setting up the MetaMask ethereum wallet to work with the private blockchain.
  • Transfer funds between multiple accounts.
  • Create, deploy and invoke a smart contract on the private blockchain using remix.
  • Setting up ethereum block explorer over the private blockchain.

https://medium.facilelogin.com/build-your-own-blockchain-b8eaeea2f891

Everything You Wanted To Know About Blockchains but were too afraid to ask

Ah, blockchains.

Kind of a big deal. You’d have to be a total square not to have heard about them. Me? I’ve got eight.

Often over-complicated, over-mysticised, over-singularised (I don’t even know what the right word for it is, but people say The Blockchain a lot). What are they? Join me for a rough tour from the ground up and I’ll try to make sure you leave here knowing the answer to one question:

What are people talking about when they talk about blockchains?

There’s a lot to cover, so it’s actually going to come in two parts. This, the first, will look at the data structures known as blockchains and their properties, along with any other bits and pieces you need to make sense of them.

The second part will apply what you’ve learnt to the practical and widespread applications of blockchains to power distributed ledgers, cryptocurrencies such as Bitcoin and Litecoin and smart-contract based chains like Etherium.

https://unwttng.com/what-is-a-blockchain

Blockchains: How They Work and Why They’ll Change the World

…Now, eight years after the first blockchain was built, people are trying to apply it to procedures and processes beyond merely the moving of money with varying degrees of success. In effect, they’re asking, What other agreements can a blockchain automate? What other middlemen can blockchain technology retire?

Can a blockchain find people offering rides, link them up with people who are trying to go somewhere, and give the two parties a transparent platform for payment? Can a blockchain act as a repository and a replay platform for TV shows, movies, and other digital media while keeping track of royalties and paying content creators? Can a blockchain check the status of airline flights and pay travelers a previously agreed upon amount if their planes don’t take off on time?

If so, then blockchain technology could get rid of Uber, Netflix, and every flight-insurance provider on the market…

https://spectrum.ieee.org/computing/networks/blockchains-how-they-work-and-why-theyll-change-the-world

Learn Blockchains by Building One

You’re here because, like me, you’re psyched about the rise of Cryptocurrencies. And you want to know how Blockchains work—the fundamental technology behind them.

But understanding Blockchains isn’t easy—or at least wasn’t for me. I trudged through dense videos, followed porous tutorials, and dealt with the amplified frustration of too few examples.

I like learning by doing. It forces me to deal with the subject matter at a code level, which gets it sticking. If you do the same, at the end of this guide you’ll have a functioning Blockchain with a solid grasp of how they work.

https://hackernoon.com/learn-blockchains-by-building-one-117428612f46