The What, Why, and When of Single-Table Design with DynamoDB

Yet data modeling with DynamoDB is tricky for those used to the relational databases that have dominated for the past few decades. There are a number of quirks around data modeling with DynamoDB, but the biggest one is the recommendation from AWS to use a single table for all of your records.

In this post, we’ll do a deep dive on the concepts behind single-table design. You’ll learn:

https://www.alexdebrie.com/posts/dynamodb-single-table/

Z-Order Indexing for Multifaceted Queries in Amazon DynamoDB

Using Z-order indexing, you can efficiently run range queries on any combination of fields in your schema. Although Amazon DynamoDB doesn’t natively support Z-order indexing, you can implement the functionality entirely from the client side. A single Z-order index can outperform and even replace entire collections of secondary indexes, saving you money and improving your throughput.

https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/database/z-order-indexing-for-multifaceted-queries-in-amazon-dynamodb-part-1/

In a previous AWS Database Blog post, I introduced Z-order indexing, a way in which you can sort your data to efficiently query an Amazon DynamoDB table by using range bounds on multiple attributes. In this post, we explore the process of creating a schema for your index. We look at how to decide which attributes to include in your schema, how your index’s schema impacts query efficiency, and how to work with a variety of data types.

This post builds on concepts that are described in Part 1, so I recommend taking some time to review it before diving in.

https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/database/z-order-indexing-for-multifaceted-queries-in-amazon-dynamodb-part-2/

Make a New Year’s resolution: Follow Amazon DynamoDB best practices

As the new year begins, we encourage you to make a resolution to follow Amazon DynamoDB best practices. Following these best practices can help you maximize performance and minimize throughput costs when working with DynamoDB. Click the following links to learn more about each best practice in the DynamoDB documentation.

https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/database/make-a-new-years-resolution-follow-amazon-dynamodb-best-practices/

Data modeling with Amazon DynamoDB

Modeling your data in the DynamoDB database structure requires a different approach from modeling in traditional relational databases. Alex DeBrie has written a number of applications using DynamoDB and is the creator of DynamoDBGuide.com, a free resource for learning DynamoDB. In this session, we review the key principles of modeling your DynamoDB tables and teach you some practical patterns to use in your data models. Leave this session with steps to follow and principles to guide you as you work with DynamoDB.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DIQVJqiSUkE

How Uber stores financial transactions in ledgers using Amazon DynamoDB

Each day, millions of people move around the world with Uber. The associated financial transactions are stored in Uber’s Ledger Store with provable completeness backed by Amazon DynamoDB. In this session, we discuss why provable completeness is key for compliant storage of financial and other ledger-like use cases, and we explain how this can be implemented at global scale by using DynamoDB.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iN6mhI5hFt4

How Verizon Media implemented push notification using Amazon DynamoDB

Verizon Media had to create a better, stronger, and faster push notification system to serve the requirements of iconic Verizon brands, fulfill push notification completion time of 27 million devices in under three minutes, and consistently show the push “toast” on all users’ lock screens. Verizon decided to use Amazon DynamoDB and other AWS services such as Amazon ElastiCache and Amazon SQS in conjunction with its own Vespa search engine to power all the use cases of its brands. It also uses Kubernetes to orchestrate microservices across many Amazon EC2 instances.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FwWT6a3ikZ4

Design patterns for high-volume, time-series data in Amazon DynamoDB

Time-series data shows a pattern of change over time. For example, you might have a fleet of Internet of Things (IoT) devices that record environmental data through their sensors, as shown in the following example graph. This data could include temperature, pressure, humidity, and other environmental variables. Because each IoT device tracks these values over regular periods, your backend needs to ingest up to hundreds, thousands, or millions of events every second.

Graph of sensor data

In this blog post, I explain how to optimize Amazon DynamoDB for high-volume, time-series data scenarios. I do this by using a design pattern powered by automation and serverless computing.

https://aws.amazon.com/pt/blogs/database/design-patterns-for-high-volume-time-series-data-in-amazon-dynamodb/