Run your Kubernetes Workloads on Amazon EC2 Spot Instances with Amazon EKS

Many organizations today are using containers to package source code and dependencies into lightweight, immutable artifacts that can be deployed reliably to any environment.

Kubernetes (K8s) is an open-source framework for automated scheduling and management of containerized workloads. In addition to master nodes, a K8s cluster is made up of worker nodes where containers are scheduled and run.

Amazon Elastic Container Service for Kubernetes (Amazon EKS) is a managed service that removes the need to manage the installation, scaling, or administration of master nodes and the etcd distributed key-value store. It provides a highly available and secure K8s control plane.

This post demonstrates how to use Spot Instances as K8s worker nodes, and shows the areas of provisioning, automatic scaling, and handling interruptions (termination) of K8s worker nodes across your cluster.

What this post does not cover

This post focuses primarily on EC2 instance scaling. This post also assumes a default interruption mode of terminate for EC2 instances, though there are other interruption types, stop and hibernate. For stateless K8s sessions, I recommend choosing the interruption mode of terminate.

https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/run-your-kubernetes-workloads-on-amazon-ec2-spot-instances-with-amazon-eks/

EC2 Network Performance Cheat Sheet

EC2 Network Performance Cheat Sheet

What is the maximum network throughput of your EC2 instance? The answer to this question is key to choosing the type of an instance or defining monitoring alerts on network throughput. Unfortunately, you will only find very vague information about the networking capabilities of EC2 instances within AWS’s service description and documentation. That is why I run a network performance benchmark for almost all EC2 instance types within the last few days. The results are compiled into the following cheat sheet.

https://cloudonaut.io/ec2-network-performance-cheat-sheet/

Amazon EBS Update – New Elastic Volumes Change Everything

New Elastic Volumes
Today we are launching a new EBS feature we call Elastic Volumes and making it available for all current-generation EBS volumes attached to current-generation EC2 instances. You can now increase volume size, adjust performance, or change the volume type while the volume is in use. You can continue to use your application while the change takes effect.

This new feature will greatly simplify (or even eliminate) many of your planning, tuning, and space management chores. Instead of a traditional provisioning cycle that can take weeks or months, you can make changes to your storage infrastructure instantaneously, with a simple API call.

You can address the following scenarios (and many more that you can come up with on your own) using Elastic Volumes:

Changing Workloads – You set up your infrastructure in a rush and used the General Purpose SSD volumes for your block storage. After gaining some experience you figure out that the Throughput Optimized volumes are a better fit, and simply change the type of the volume.

Spiking Demand – You are running a relational database on a Provisioned IOPS volume that is set to handle a moderate amount of traffic during the month, with a 10x spike in traffic  during the final three days of each month due to month-end processing.  You can use Elastic Volumes to dial up the provisioning in order to handle the spike, and then dial it down afterward.

Increasing Storage – You provisioned a volume for 100 GiB and an alarm goes off indicating that it is now at 90% of capacity. You increase the size of the volume and expand the file system to match, with no downtime, and in a fully automated fashion.

https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/amazon-ebs-update-new-elastic-volumes-change-everything/