How Streak built a graph database on Cloud Spanner to wrangle billions of emails

Streak makes a CRM add-on for Gmail, and recently adopted Cloud Spanner to take advantage of its scalability and SQL capabilities to implement a graph data model. Read on to learn about their decision, what they love about the system, and the ways in which it still needs work.

https://cloud.google.com/blog/products/databases/how-streak-built-a-graph-database-on-cloud-spanner-to-wrangle-billions-of-emails

Advertisements

Google I/O 2018 – Codelabs

Google Developers Codelabs provide a guided, tutorial, hands-on coding experience. Most codelabs will step you through the process of building a small application, or adding a new feature to an existing application. They cover a wide range of topics such as Android Wear, Google Compute Engine, Project Tango, and Google APIs on iOS.

https://codelabs.developers.google.com/io2018

Node.js event loop workflow & lifecycle in low level

A year back while describing the differences between setImmediate & process.nextTick, I wrote a bit on the low level architecture of node’s event-loop.
Surprisingly, the readers of that post became more interested about the event-loop part, than the rest of the parts and I have received a lot of responses and queries on the same.
That’s why I’ve decided to come up with a big picture of the low level work flow of node.js event loop.

I recommend you to read the entire article and not just bullet points as there are some great infos inside the paragraphs!

Why am I writing this?

Well, if I google about node.js event loop, majority of the articles out there does not describe the big picture (they try to describe with a very high level abstraction).

http://voidcanvas.com/nodejs-event-loop/

What I learned in 2017 Writing Go

A little over a year ago, I joined Cloud Foundry to work on Loggregator, Cloud Foundry’s application logging component. Its core concern is best-effort log delivery without pushing back on upstream writers. Loggregator is written entirely in Go.

After spending more than a thousand hours working with Go in a non-trivial code base, I still admire the language and enjoy using it. Nonetheless, our team struggled with a number of problems, many of which seem unique to Go. What follows is a list of the most salient problems.

https://www.commandercoriander.net/blog/2017/12/31/writing-go/