Serverless Framework example for Golang and Lambda

Everyone, the day has come.

AWS Lambda is finally. Compatible. With Golang. đź––

Here’s how you can start using Go with the Serverless Framework RIGHT NOW and deploy Lambdas to your heart’s content.

https://serverless.com/blog/framework-example-golang-lambda-support/

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What I learned in 2017 Writing Go

A little over a year ago, I joined Cloud Foundry to work on Loggregator, Cloud Foundry’s application logging component. Its core concern is best-effort log delivery without pushing back on upstream writers. Loggregator is written entirely in Go.

After spending more than a thousand hours working with Go in a non-trivial code base, I still admire the language and enjoy using it. Nonetheless, our team struggled with a number of problems, many of which seem unique to Go. What follows is a list of the most salient problems.

https://www.commandercoriander.net/blog/2017/12/31/writing-go/

What Are We Doing With Google’s Flutter?

GeekyAnts has been working with React Native since its launch in 2015 and with many awesome apps to our credit, we are proud to say that we are one of the top React Native companies out there! 🎉 🎆

Over the years, we have noticed a few issues in React Native apps that make us want for “something more”.

Our search for this “something more” has led us to Google’s Flutter!

https://hackernoon.com/what-are-we-doing-with-googles-flutter-74ff29dd256a

Google Cloud vs AWS in 2017 (Comparing the Giants)

It’s no surprise that cloud computing has literally taken the world by storm. For most businesses and enterprises, gone are the days of struggling with complicated on-premise server rooms and complicated networking. Over the past decade, cloud computing has become more cost-efficient, secure, and reliable. The major providers in the industry are now investing heavily in their hardware, software, and global networking infrastructure to obtain more market share, which has resulted in unparalleled performance. Healthy competition is always a win for consumers and partners as this drives costs down and requires them to constantly innovate to stay ahead.

Typically when we think of cloud computing providers we are referring to the three giants in the industry: Azure, Google Cloud, and AWS. Today we’re going to compare just two of them, Google Cloud vs AWS. We exclusively utilize Google Cloud Platform here at Kinsta, but we’ll try to keep this article as unbiased as possible and explain everything in layman’s terms. There are definitely some advantages and disadvantages to both providers.  Trust us, we’ve had our own share of challenges! No matter which provider you choose, you’ll always encounter issues at some point along the way.

https://kinsta.com/blog/google-cloud-vs-aws/?utm_campaign=blog&utm_medium=social&utm_source=facebook&utm_content=google-cloud-vs-aws

Introducing Cloud Firestore: Our New Document Database for Apps

Today we’re excited to launch Cloud Firestore, a fully-managed NoSQL document database for mobile and web app development. It’s designed to easily store and sync app data at global scale, and it’s now available in beta.

Key features of Cloud Firestore include:

  • Documents and collections with powerful querying
  • iOS, Android, and Web SDKs with offline data access
  • Real-time data synchronization
  • Automatic, multi-region data replication with strong consistency
  • Node, Python, Go, and Java server SDKs

And of course, we’ve aimed for the simplicity and ease-of-use that is always top priority for Firebase, while still making sure that Cloud Firestore can scale to power even the largest apps.

https://firebase.googleblog.com/2017/10/introducing-cloud-firestore.html

Android 8.0 Oreo, thoroughly reviewed

Android 8.0 Oreo is the 26th version of the world’s most popular operating system. This year, Google’s mobile-and-everything-else OS hit two billion monthly active users—and that’s just counting phones and tablets. What can all those users expect from the new version? In an interview with Ars earlier this year, Android’s VP of engineering Dave Burke said that the 8.0 release would be about “foundation and fundamentals.” His team was guided by a single question: “What are we doing to Android to make sure Android is in a great place in the next 5 to 10 years?”

Nabisco produced a limited run of Android-themed Oreos for the launch event.
Nabisco produced a limited run of Android-themed Oreos for the launch event.
Oreo

Take a closer look at Oreo and you really can see the focus on fundamentals. Google is revamping the notification system with a new layout, new controls, and a new color scheme. It’s taking responsibility for Android security with a Google-branded security solution. App background processing has been reined in, hopefully providing better battery life and more consistent performance. There’s even been some work done on Android’s perpetual update problem, with Project Treble allowing for easier update development and streaming updates allowing for easier installation by users. And, as with every release, more parts of Android get more modularized, with emojis and GPU driver updates now available without an OS update.Like its partnership with Nestlé for Android 4.4 “KitKat,” Google is taking its alphabetical snack-themed codenames to the extreme with 8.0. This time Nabisco is sharing its “Oreo” brand with Google. (We’ve yet to hear about any kind of monetary arrangement for this sort of thing). Google’s Eclipse-themed launch party was complete with custom Oreo cookies featuring an Android robot design and green filling.

Two billion users is a huge number, but with Android 8.0, Google shows that it still isn’t satisfied. A new initiative called “Android Go” targets the developing world, where cheap devices and limited access to data and power require taking a different look at how some parts of Android function.

Oreo will also serve as the base for three new Android form factors. It will be built into cars as “Android Automotive,” where Google works with car OEMs to integrate Android. Android 8.0 will also be the base OS for “Android Things,” an “Internet of things” (IoT) version of the OS designed to easily manage on embedded devices. Finally, Google’s virtual reality “Daydream” group will also launch a new form factor with Oreo: standalone VR headsets.

So, coming soon to your phone, your tablet, your watch, your TV, your car, your “things,” and your VR headset—it’s Android 8.0 Oreo. Let’s dive in.

Table of Contents

https://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2017/09/android-8-0-oreo-thoroughly-reviewed/

Fast Properties in V8

In this blog post we would like to explain how V8 handles JavaScript properties internally. From a JavaScript point of view there are only a few distinctions necessary for properties. JavaScript objects mostly behave like dictionaries, with string keys and arbitrary objects as values. The specification does however treat integer-indexed properties and other properties differently during iteration. Other than that, the different properties behave mostly the same, independent of whether they are integer indexed or not.

However, under the hood V8 does rely on several different representations of properties for performance and memory reasons. In this blog post we are going to explain how V8 can provide fast property access while handling dynamically-added properties. Understanding how properties work is essential for explaining how optimizations such as inline caches work in V8.

This post explains the difference in handling integer-indexed and named properties. After that we show how V8 maintains HiddenClasses when adding named properties in order to provide a fast way to identify the shape of an object. We’ll then continue giving insights into how named properties are optimized for fast accesses or fast modification depending on the usage. In the final section we provide details on how V8 handles integer-indexed properties or array indices.

http://v8project.blogspot.com.br/2017/08/fast-properties.html