Run your Kubernetes Workloads on Amazon EC2 Spot Instances with Amazon EKS

Many organizations today are using containers to package source code and dependencies into lightweight, immutable artifacts that can be deployed reliably to any environment.

Kubernetes (K8s) is an open-source framework for automated scheduling and management of containerized workloads. In addition to master nodes, a K8s cluster is made up of worker nodes where containers are scheduled and run.

Amazon Elastic Container Service for Kubernetes (Amazon EKS) is a managed service that removes the need to manage the installation, scaling, or administration of master nodes and the etcd distributed key-value store. It provides a highly available and secure K8s control plane.

This post demonstrates how to use Spot Instances as K8s worker nodes, and shows the areas of provisioning, automatic scaling, and handling interruptions (termination) of K8s worker nodes across your cluster.

What this post does not cover

This post focuses primarily on EC2 instance scaling. This post also assumes a default interruption mode of terminate for EC2 instances, though there are other interruption types, stop and hibernate. For stateless K8s sessions, I recommend choosing the interruption mode of terminate.

https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/compute/run-your-kubernetes-workloads-on-amazon-ec2-spot-instances-with-amazon-eks/

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AWS Workshop for Kubernetes

This is a self-paced workshop designed for Development and Operations teams who would like to leverage Kubernetes on Amazon Web Services (AWS).

This workshop provides instructions to create, manage, and scale a Kubernetes cluster on AWS, as well as how to deploy applications, scale them, run stateless and stateful containers, perform service discovery between different microservices, and other similar concepts.

It also shows deep integration with several AWS technologies.

We recommend at least 2 hours to complete the workshop.

Simple deployment to Amazon EKS

Recently, Amazon announced that Elastic Container Service for Kubernetes (EKS) is generally available. Previously only open to a few folks via request access, EKS is now available to everyone, allowing all users to get managed Kubernetes clusters on AWS. In light of this development, we’re excited to announce official support for EKS with GitLab.

GitLab is designed for Kubernetes. While you can use GitLab to deploy anywhere, from bare metal to VMs, when you deploy to Kubernetes, you get access to the most powerful features. In this post, I’ll walk through our Kubernetes integration, highlight a few key features, and discuss how you can use the integration with EKS.

https://about.gitlab.com/2018/06/06/eks-gitlab-integration/

EKS vs. ECS: orchestrating containers on AWS

AWS announced Kubernetes-as-a-Service at re:Invent in November 2017: Elastic Container Service for Kubernetes (EKS). Since yesterday, EKS is generally available. I discussed ECS vs. Kubernetesbefore EKS was a thing. Therefore, I’d like to take a second attempt and compare EKS with ECS.

Before comparing the differences, let us start with what EKS and ECS have in common. Both solutions are managing containers distributed among a fleet of virtual machines. Managing containers includes:

  • Monitoring and replacing failed containers.
  • Deploying new versions of your containers.
  • Scaling the number of containers based on load.

What are the differences between EKS and ECS?

https://cloudonaut.io/eks-vs-ecs-orchestrating-containers-on-aws/

AWS Workshop for Kubernetes

This is a self-paced workshop designed for Development and Operations teams who would like to leverage Kubernetes on Amazon Web Services (AWS).

This workshop provides instructions to create, manage, and scale a Kubernetes cluster on AWS, as well as how to deploy applications, scale them, run stateless and stateful containers, perform service discovery between different microservices, and other similar concepts.

It also shows deep integration with several AWS technologies.

We recommend at least 2 hours to complete the workshop.

https://github.com/aws-samples/aws-workshop-for-kubernetes

How we improved Kubernetes Dashboard UI in 1.4 for your production needs​

With the release of Kubernetes 1.4 last week, Dashboard – the official web UI for Kubernetes – has a number of exciting updates and improvements of its own. The past three months have been busy ones for the Dashboard team, and we’re excited to share the resulting features of that effort here. If you’re not familiar with Dashboard, the GitHub repo is a great place to get started.

A quick recap before unwrapping our shiny new features: Dashboard was initially released March 2016. One of the focuses for Dashboard throughout its lifetime has been the onboarding experience; it’s a less intimidating way for Kubernetes newcomers to get started, and by showing multiple resources at once, it provides contextualization lacking in kubectl (the CLI). After that initial release though, the product team realized that fine-tuning for a beginner audience was getting ahead of ourselves: there were still fundamental product requirements that Dashboard needed to satisfy in order to have a productive UX to onboard new users too. That became our mission for this release: closing the gap between Dashboard and kubectl by showing more resources, leveraging a web UI’s strengths in monitoring and troubleshooting, and architecting this all in a user friendly way.

http://blog.kubernetes.io/2016/10/Production-Kubernetes-Dashboard-UI-1.4-improvements_3.html