Dive into Deep Learning

An interactive deep learning book with code, math, and discussions, based on the NumPy interface.

https://d2l.ai/index.html

Deploy machine learning models in production

Key features

  • Multi framework: Cortex supports TensorFlow, PyTorch, scikit-learn, XGBoost, and more.
  • Autoscaling: Cortex automatically scales APIs to handle production workloads.
  • CPU / GPU support: Cortex can run inference on CPU or GPU infrastructure.
  • Spot instances: Cortex supports EC2 spot instances.
  • Rolling updates: Cortex updates deployed APIs without any downtime.
  • Log streaming: Cortex streams logs from deployed models to your CLI.
  • Prediction monitoring: Cortex monitors network metrics and tracks predictions.
  • Minimal configuration: Cortex deployments are defined in a single cortex.yaml file.

https://github.com/cortexlabs/cortex

Go + Services = One Goliath Project

Khan Academy is embarking on a huge effort to rebuild our server software on a more modern stack in Go.

At Khan Academy, we don’t shy away from a challenge. After all, we’re a non-profit with a mission to provide a “free world-class education to anyone, anywhere”. Challenges don’t get much bigger than that.

Our mission requires us to create and maintain software to provide tools which help teachers and coaches who work with students, and a personalized learning experience both in and out of school. Millions of people rely on our servers each month to provide a wide variety of features we’ve built up over the past ten years.

Ten years is a long time in technology! We chose Python as our backend server language and it has been a productive choice for us. Of course, ten years ago we chose Python 2 because Python 3 was still very new and not well supported.

https://engineering.khanacademy.org/posts/goliath.htm

ID Card Digitization and Information Extraction using Deep Learning – A Review

In this article, we will discuss how any organisation can use deep learning to automate ID card information extraction, data entry and reviewing procedures to achieve greater efficiency and cut costs. We will review different deep learning approaches that have been used in the past for this problem, compare the results and look into the latest in the field. We will discuss graph neural networks and how they are being used for digitization.

While we will be looking at the specific use-case of ID cards, anyone dealing with any form of documents, invoices and receipts, etc and is interested in building a technical understanding of how deep learning and OCR can solve the problem will find the information useful.

https://nanonets.com/blog/id-card-digitization-deep-learning/

Unicode & Character Encodings in Python: A Painless Guide

Handling character encodings in Python or any other language can at times seem painful. Places such as Stack Overflow have thousands of questions stemming from confusion over exceptions like UnicodeDecodeError and UnicodeEncodeError. This tutorial is designed to clear the Exception fog and illustrate that working with text and binary data in Python 3 can be a smooth experience. Python’s Unicode support is strong and robust, but it takes some time to master.

This tutorial is different because it’s not language-agnostic but instead deliberately Python-centric. You’ll still get a language-agnostic primer, but you’ll then dive into illustrations in Python, with text-heavy paragraphs kept to a minimum. You’ll see how to use concepts of character encodings in live Python code.

https://realpython.com/python-encodings-guide/

Python at Netflix

As many of us prepare to go to PyCon, we wanted to share a sampling of how Python is used at Netflix. We use Python through the full content lifecycle, from deciding which content to fund all the way to operating the CDN that serves the final video to 148 million members. We use and contribute to many open-source Python packages, some of which are mentioned below. 

https://medium.com/netflix-techblog/python-at-netflix-bba45dae649e

PySnooper – Never use print for debugging again

PySnooper is a poor man’s debugger.

You’re trying to figure out why your Python code isn’t doing what you think it should be doing. You’d love to use a full-fledged debugger with breakpoints and watches, but you can’t be bothered to set one up right now.

You want to know which lines are running and which aren’t, and what the values of the local variables are.

Most people would use print lines, in strategic locations, some of them showing the values of variables.

PySnooper lets you do the same, except instead of carefully crafting the right print lines, you just add one decorator line to the function you’re interested in. You’ll get a play-by-play log of your function, including which lines ran and when, and exactly when local variables were changed.

What makes PySnooper stand out from all other code intelligence tools? You can use it in your shitty, sprawling enterprise codebase without having to do any setup. Just slap the decorator on, as shown below, and redirect the output to a dedicated log file by specifying its path as the first argument.

https://github.com/cool-RR/pysnooper