Problem Solving with Algorithms and Data Structures using Python

  • To review the ideas of computer science, programming, and problem-solving.
  • To understand abstraction and the role it plays in the problem-solving process.
  • To understand and implement the notion of an abstract data type.
  • To review the Python programming language.

http://interactivepython.org/runestone/static/pythonds/index.html

Advertisements

All the Serverless announcements at re:Invent 2018

re:Invent 2018 announcements

Latest:

Most Exciting:

Lambda:

https://serverless.com/blog/reinvent-2018-serverless-announcements/

AWS Toolkits for PyCharm, IntelliJ (Preview), and Visual Studio Code (Preview)

Software developers have their own preferred tools. Some use powerful editors, others Integrated Development Environments (IDEs) that are tailored for specific languages and platforms. In 2014 I created my first AWS Lambdafunction using the editor in the Lambda console. Now, you can choose from a rich set of tools to build and deploy serverless applications. For example, the editor in the Lambda console has been greatly enhanced last year when AWS Cloud9 was released. For .NET applications, you can use the AWS Toolkit for Visual Studio and AWS Tools for Visual Studio Team Services.

AWS Toolkits for PyCharm, IntelliJ, and Visual Studio Code

Today, we are announcing the general availability of the AWS Toolkit for PyCharm. We are also announcing the developer preview of the AWS Toolkits for IntelliJ and Visual Studio Code, which are under active development in GitHub. These open source toolkits will enable you to easily develop serverless applications, including a full create, step-through debug, and deploy experience in the IDE and language of your choice, be it Python, Java, Node.js, or .NET.

For example, using the AWS Toolkit for PyCharm you can:

These toolkits are distributed under the open source Apache License, Version 2.0.

https://aws.amazon.com/pt/blogs/aws/new-aws-toolkits-for-pycharm-intellij-preview-and-visual-studio-code-preview/

AWS Lambda Programming Language Comparison

benjamin-wong-485320-unsplash

Now that AWS Lambda has added PowerShell to its growing list of supported languages, let’s take a moment to compare and contrast the different languages available to us.

In this post, we’ll take a look at these languages from a number of angles:

  • Cold start performance: performance during a cold start
  • Warm performance: performance after the initial cold start
  • Cost: does it cost you more to run functions in one language over another? If so, why?
  • Ecosystem: libraries, deployment tooling, etc.
  • Platform support: is the language supported by other function-as-a-service (FAAS) platforms?

We will also talk about specialized use cases such as Machine Learning (ML) as well as paying attention to the special needs of the enterprise. Finally, we’ll round off the discussion by looking at a few languages that are not officially supported but that you can use with Lambda via shims.

I should stress that the goal of this post is to consider the relative strengths and weaknesses of each language within the specific context of AWS Lambda. This is not a general purpose language comparison!

https://blog.epsagon.com/aws-lambda-programming-language-comparison

190 universities just launched 600 free online courses. Here’s the full list

If you haven’t heard, universities around the world are offering their courses online for free (or at least partially free). These courses are collectively called MOOCs or Massive Open Online Courses.

In the past six years or so, over 800 universities have created more than 10,000 of these MOOCs. And I’ve been keeping track of these MOOCs the entire time over at Class Central, ever since they rose to prominence.

In the past four months alone, 190 universities have announced 600 such free online courses. I’ve compiled a list of them and categorized them according to the following subjects: Computer Science, Mathematics, Programming, Data Science, Humanities, Social Sciences, Education & Teaching, Health & Medicine, Business, Personal Development, Engineering, Art & Design, and finally Science.

If you have trouble figuring out how to signup for Coursera courses for free, don’t worry — here’s an article on how to do that, too.

Many of these are completely self-paced, so you can start taking them at your convenience.

https://qz.com/1437623/600-free-online-courses-you-can-take-from-universities-worldwide/