URL shortening service written in Go and React

Short backend is built on top of Uncle Bob’s Clean Architecture, the central objective of which is separation of concerns.

Short adopts Microservices Architecture to organize dependent services around business capabilities and to enable independent deployment of each service.

Short leverages Kubernetes to automate deployment, scaling, and management of containerized microservices.

Short is maintained by a small team of talented software engineers working at Google, Uber, and Vmware as a side project.

https://github.com/short-d/short

JavaScript fundamentals before learning React

react js requirements

After all my teachings about React, be it online for a larger audience or on-site for companies transitioning to web development and React, I always come to the conclusion that React is all about JavaScript. Newcomers to React but also myself see it as an advantage, because you carry your JavaScript knowledge for a longer time around compared to your React skills.

During my workshops a greater part of the material is about JavaScript and not React. Most of it boils down to JavaScript ES6 and beyond features and syntax, but also ternary operators, shorthand versions in the language, the this object, JavaScript built-in functions (map, reduce, filter) or more general concepts such as composability, reusability, immutability or higher-order functions. These are the fundamentals, which you don’t need necessarily to master before starting with React, but which will definitely come up while learning or practicing it.

The following walkthrough is my attempt giving you an almost extensive yet concise list about all the different JavaScript functionalities to complement your React application. If you have any other things which are not in the list, just leave a comment for this article and I will keep it up to date.

https://www.robinwieruch.de/javascript-fundamentals-react-requirements/

State of React Native 2018

It’s been a while since we last published a status update about React Native.

At Facebook, we’re using React Native more than ever and for many important projects. One of our most popular products is Marketplace, one of the top-level tabs in our app which is used by 800 million people each month. Since its creation in 2015, all of Marketplace has been built with React Native, including over a hundred full-screen views throughout different parts of the app.

https://facebook.github.io/react-native/blog/2018/06/14/state-of-react-native-2018

Using React, Firebase, and Ant Design to Quickly Prototype Web Applications

In this guide I will show you how to use Firebase, React, and Ant Design as building blocks to build functional, high-fidelity web applications. To illustrate this, we’ll go through an example of building a todo list app.

These days, there are so many tools available for web development that it can feel paralyzing. Which server should you use? What front-end framework are you going to choose? Usually, the recommended approach is to use the technologies that you know best. Generally, this means choosing a battle-tested database like PostgreSQL or MySQL, choosing a MVC framework for your webserver (my favourite is Adonis), and either using that framework’s rendering engine or using a client-side javascript library like ReactJS or AngularJS.

Using the above approach is productive – especially if you have good boilerplate to get you started – but what if you want to build something quickly with nearly zero setup time? Sometimes a mockup doesn’t convey enough information to a client; sometimes you want to build out an MVP super fast for a new product.

The source code for this example is available here. If you’re looking for a good IDE to use during this guide, I highly recommend Visual Studio Code.

https://nrempel.com/guides/react-firebase-ant-design/

Rekit Studio: An IDE for React and Redux Development

We’re very excited to announce the stable release of Rekit Studio, a complete IDE for React, Redux and React Router development! Though it’s maybe new to some of you, it has helped us build complicated web apps for more than one year.

Rekit Studio

The previous version of Rekit Studio was Rekit Portal, which has no ability to edit code. Now thanks to Monaco Editor which also powers VS Code, and prettier, an amazing tool for formatting code, Rekit Studio provides great experience for coding. That’s also why we renamed it from ‘portal’ to ‘studio’.

As an IDE, besides code editing, Rekit Studio provides the capability of code generation, dependency diagram, refactoring, build, unit tests and a meaningful way of code navigation. You will no longer care about how to setup the project, config webpack or organize folder structure. Rekit Studio provides an integrated way to manage the project. That’s what makes Rekit Studio different from other code editors like Sublime Text, VS Code.

https://medium.com/@nate_wang/introducing-rekit-studio-a-real-ide-for-react-and-redux-development-baf0c99cb542

The Ultimate Guide to JavaScript Frameworks

Keeping up with JavaScript frameworks can be a challenge. There are a lot of them, and seemingly another one every month. How do you know which ones might be right for your project? What are their strengths and weaknesses? How do you get started?

That’s where this guide comes in. It’s a living document that is a reference for all known front end JavaScript frameworks (archived or deprecated projects are not included). In this case, the term “frameworks” is being used in a broad sense. It includes user interface (UI) libraries like React, as well as full frameworks like Angular.

https://javascriptreport.com/the-ultimate-guide-to-javascript-frameworks/

REACT, REDUX AND JAVASCRIPT ARCHITECTURE

The content of this article was originally presented to the Squiz Front-End Engineering group.

Whether you use them or not, React and Redux are important. They have changed the way we think about structuring front-end web applications. They can be very powerful. But they are not magic. JavaScript code does not automatically become better just because it uses React. It is easy to write horrible React code, just like it’s easy to write horrible vanilla JavaScript. So, why is React important then? The thing is, understanding how to write React and Redux code is one thing. Understanding why you’d want to use React and Redux is another matter entirely. Once you understand the why of React and Redux, then modern JavaScript starts to make more sense. This is true whatever framework you’re using. Whether it’s React, Vue, Ember, Angular, Web Components, or something else entirely. React and Redux have had a huge impact on how we organise front-end code.1

So, this article might seem long-winded. I do want to show you how to write actual React and Redux code. But it will take a while to get there. And there is a reason. Redux is not terribly complicated. But with Redux (like React), understanding why you’d want to use it is much more interesting than how it works. So, though it might take us a little while to get to Redux, I think the journey will be worth it.

https://jrsinclair.com/articles/2018/react-redux-javascript-architecture/

I just asked 23,000 developers what they think of JavaScript. Here’s what I learned.

I recently published our results for the 2017 edition of the annual State of JavaScript survey, collected from over 23,000 developers.

The results revealed many things, from popularity trends to salary breakdowns. You’ll want to take a look for yourself if you haven’t done so already. But among all these data, here are the 10 things that stood out most to me.

Even if you’ve already seen the results, you might want to check out the new Features and Opinions sections we’ve just added.

https://medium.freecodecamp.org/i-just-asked-23-000-developers-what-they-think-of-javascript-heres-what-i-learned-9a06b61998fa

Neural Networks in JavaScript with deeplearn.js

A couple of my recent articles gave an introduction into a subfield of artificial intelligence by implementing foundational machine learning algorithms in JavaScript (e.g. linear regression with gradient descentlinear regression with normal equation or logistic regression with gradient descent). These machine learning algorithms were implemented from scratch in JavaScript by using the math.js node package for linear algebra (e.g. matrix operations) and calculus. You can find all of these machine learning algorithms grouped in a GitHub organization. If you find any flaws in them, please help me out to make the organization a great learning resource for others. I intend to grow the amount of repositories showcasing different machine learning algorithms to provide web developers a starting point when they enter the domain of machine learning.

Personally, I found it becomes quite complex and challenging to implement those algorithms from scratch at some point. Especially when combining JavaScript and neural networks with the implementation of forward and back propagation. Since I am learning about neural networks myself at the moment, I started to look for libraries doing the job for me. Hopefully I am able to catch up with those foundational implementations to publish them in the GitHub organization in the future. However, for now, as I researched about potential candidates to facilitate neural networks in JavaScript, I came across deeplearn.js which was recently released by Google. So I gave it a shot. In this article / tutorial, I want to share my experiences by implementing with you a neural network in JavaScript with deeplearn.js to solve a real world problem for web accessibility.

I highly recommend to take the Machine Learning course by Andrew Ng. This article will not explain the machine learning algorithms in detail, but only demonstrate their usage in JavaScript. The course on the other hand goes into detail and explains these algorithms in an amazing quality. At this point in time of writing the article, I learn about the topic myself and try to internalize my learnings by writing about them and applying them in JavaScript. If you find any parts for improvements, please reach out in the comments or create a Issue/Pull Request on GitHub.

https://www.robinwieruch.de/neural-networks-deeplearnjs-javascript/

The React Story: How Facebook’s Instagram Acquisition Led To The Open Sourcing of React.js

React is now one of the most popular JavaScript UI libraries in the world. It has over 70K stars on GitHub, over 1100 contributors, over 6M downloads this past month alone, and well over 4K company stacks. But when Facebook first introduced React to the world, not too many people cared.

For the latest episode of Stack Stories, we did something a bit different. We decided to focus on the origin story of the one of the most popular technologies in the software development world: React. We sat down with Pete Hunt, one of the original creators of React, now CEO at Smyte, to get the untold, in-depth story of why React was first created, how it gained adoption within Facebook due to the Instagram acquisition, and it’s eventual release to the public.

Listen to the interview in full or check out the transcript below (edited for brevity).

Check out Stack Stories’ sponsor STRV at strv.com/stackshare.

https://stackshare.io/posts/the-react-story