I just asked 23,000 developers what they think of JavaScript. Here’s what I learned.

I recently published our results for the 2017 edition of the annual State of JavaScript survey, collected from over 23,000 developers.

The results revealed many things, from popularity trends to salary breakdowns. You’ll want to take a look for yourself if you haven’t done so already. But among all these data, here are the 10 things that stood out most to me.

Even if you’ve already seen the results, you might want to check out the new Features and Opinions sections we’ve just added.

https://medium.freecodecamp.org/i-just-asked-23-000-developers-what-they-think-of-javascript-heres-what-i-learned-9a06b61998fa

Neural Networks in JavaScript with deeplearn.js

A couple of my recent articles gave an introduction into a subfield of artificial intelligence by implementing foundational machine learning algorithms in JavaScript (e.g. linear regression with gradient descentlinear regression with normal equation or logistic regression with gradient descent). These machine learning algorithms were implemented from scratch in JavaScript by using the math.js node package for linear algebra (e.g. matrix operations) and calculus. You can find all of these machine learning algorithms grouped in a GitHub organization. If you find any flaws in them, please help me out to make the organization a great learning resource for others. I intend to grow the amount of repositories showcasing different machine learning algorithms to provide web developers a starting point when they enter the domain of machine learning.

Personally, I found it becomes quite complex and challenging to implement those algorithms from scratch at some point. Especially when combining JavaScript and neural networks with the implementation of forward and back propagation. Since I am learning about neural networks myself at the moment, I started to look for libraries doing the job for me. Hopefully I am able to catch up with those foundational implementations to publish them in the GitHub organization in the future. However, for now, as I researched about potential candidates to facilitate neural networks in JavaScript, I came across deeplearn.js which was recently released by Google. So I gave it a shot. In this article / tutorial, I want to share my experiences by implementing with you a neural network in JavaScript with deeplearn.js to solve a real world problem for web accessibility.

I highly recommend to take the Machine Learning course by Andrew Ng. This article will not explain the machine learning algorithms in detail, but only demonstrate their usage in JavaScript. The course on the other hand goes into detail and explains these algorithms in an amazing quality. At this point in time of writing the article, I learn about the topic myself and try to internalize my learnings by writing about them and applying them in JavaScript. If you find any parts for improvements, please reach out in the comments or create a Issue/Pull Request on GitHub.

https://www.robinwieruch.de/neural-networks-deeplearnjs-javascript/

The React Story: How Facebook’s Instagram Acquisition Led To The Open Sourcing of React.js

React is now one of the most popular JavaScript UI libraries in the world. It has over 70K stars on GitHub, over 1100 contributors, over 6M downloads this past month alone, and well over 4K company stacks. But when Facebook first introduced React to the world, not too many people cared.

For the latest episode of Stack Stories, we did something a bit different. We decided to focus on the origin story of the one of the most popular technologies in the software development world: React. We sat down with Pete Hunt, one of the original creators of React, now CEO at Smyte, to get the untold, in-depth story of why React was first created, how it gained adoption within Facebook due to the Instagram acquisition, and it’s eventual release to the public.

Listen to the interview in full or check out the transcript below (edited for brevity).

Check out Stack Stories’ sponsor STRV at strv.com/stackshare.

https://stackshare.io/posts/the-react-story

All the fundamental React.js concepts, jammed into this single Medium article

This article is not going to cover what React is or why you should learn it. Instead, this is a practical introduction to the fundamentals of React.js for those who are already familiar with JavaScript and know the basics of the DOM API.

All code examples below are labeled for reference. They are purely intended to provide examples of concepts. Most of them can be written in a much better way.

https://medium.freecodecamp.org/all-the-fundamental-react-js-concepts-jammed-into-this-single-medium-article-c83f9b53eac2

Polymer vs. React: Comparing Two Front-end JavaScript Libraries

Polymer vs. React—which should you use? It’s a question that inevitably crops up whenever anyone discusses the components-based future of the web. While both Polymer and React are libraries created to support a component-oriented approach to front-end web development, they do so in very different ways. In this article, we’ll try to illustrate the role each of these technologies plays in front-end web development so that you can decide which is best suited for your needs.

Polymer vs. React: Comparing Two Front-end JavaScript Libraries