Announcing the first SHA1 collision

Cryptographic hash functions like SHA-1 are a cryptographer’s swiss army knife. You’ll find that hashes play a role in browser security, managing code repositories, or even just detecting duplicate files in storage. Hash functions compress large amounts of data into a small message digest. As a cryptographic requirement for wide-spread use, finding two messages that lead to the same digest should be computationally infeasible. Over time however, this requirement can fail due to attacks on the mathematical underpinnings of hash functions or to increases in computational power.

Today, 10 years after of SHA-1 was first introduced, we are announcing the first practical technique for generating a collision. This represents the culmination of two years of research that sprung from a collaboration between the CWI Institute in Amsterdam and Google. We’ve summarized how we went about generating a collision below. As a proof of the attack, we are releasing two PDFs that have identical SHA-1 hashes but different content.

For the tech community, our findings emphasize the necessity of sunsetting SHA-1 usage. Google has advocated the deprecation of SHA-1 for many years, particularly when it comes to signing TLS certificates. As early as 2014, the Chrome team announced that they would gradually phase out using SHA-1. We hope our practical attack on SHA-1 will cement that the protocol should no longer be considered secure.

We hope that our practical attack against SHA-1 will finally convince the industry that it is urgent to move to safer alternatives such as SHA-256.

https://security.googleblog.com/2017/02/announcing-first-sha1-collision.html

The Privacy Enthusiast’s Guide to Using Android

With everyone from local scammers to government agencies trying to get hands on your data, there’s never been a better time to beef up your privacy game. Fortunately, there are a ton of options out there to keep your messages, files, and phone safe on Android.

Before we begin, we should point this out: using a smartphone is always going to be a risk. Especially one running services from Google. You can use these tips and apps to protect some of your communication, but you’re never going to be totally off the grid as long as you’re using an Android phone. That doesn’t mean you have to make it easy on an attacker, though.

How both TCP and Ethernet checksums fail

At Twitter, a team had a unusual failure where corrupt data ended up in memcache. The root cause appears to have been a switch that was corrupting packets. Most packets were being dropped and the throughput was much lower than normal, but some were still making it through. The hypothesis is that occasionally the corrupt packets had valid TCP and Ethernet checksums. One “lucky” packet stored corrupt data in memcache. Even after the switch was replaced, the errors continued until the cache was cleared. [Update 2016-02-12: Root cause found: this also involved a kernel bug!]

I was very excited to hear about this error, because it is a real-world example of something I wrote about seven years ago: The TCP checksum is weak. However, the Ethernet CRC is strong, so how could a corrupt packet pass both checks? The answer is that the Ethernet CRC is recalculated by switches. If the switch corrupts the packet and it has the same TCP checksum, the hardware blindly recalculates a new, valid Ethernet CRC when it goes out.

As Mark Callaghan pointed out, this is a very rare scenario and you should never blame the network without strong evidence. However, it isn’t impossible and others have written about similar incidents. My conclusion is that if you are creating a new network protocol, please append a 4 byte CRC (I suggest CRC32C, implemented in hardware on recent Intel, AMD, and ARM CPUs). An alternative is to use an encryption protocol (e.g. TLS), since they include cryptographic hashes (which fixed a similar incident).

The rest of this article describes the details about how this is possible, mostly so I don’t forget them.

http://www.evanjones.ca/tcp-and-ethernet-checksums-fail.html

How Hash Algorithms Work

This page was written for people who really want to know exactly how hash algorithms work. The following is a complete detailed step-by-step walk through of exactly how hash algorithms work. This is written mainly for people with very good knowledge about computers, encryption, and logical operators. I did try to write it so that everyone could understand it, but you might find it boring/dry/confusing if you aren’t really interested in how hash algorithms work and know a fair amount already.

http://www.metamorphosite.com/one-way-hash-encryption-sha1-data-software

Basics of Making a Rootkit: From syscall to hook!

WARNING: This tutorial is for educational purposes only, and by NO MEANS should you actually be malicious when (or after) making a rootkit. I thought I’d share how to do this for any security minded people who would like to learn more on how to prevent or look for rootkits. This will be done in C on Linux, probably using libraries and functions you’ve never seen. It is also advisable to do this in a VM to get the hang of compiling and loading modules. Messing with the kernel can cause things to go crazy, if not break- you have been warned.

 Jump to:

https://d0hnuts.com/2016/12/21/basics-of-making-a-rootkit-from-syscall-to-hook/

So you want to expose Go on the Internet

Back when crypto/tls was slow and net/http young, the general wisdom was to always put Go servers behind a reverse proxy like NGINX. That’s not necessary anymore!

At Cloudflare we recently experimented with exposing pure Go services to the hostile wide area network. With the Go 1.8 release, net/http and crypto/tls proved to be stable, performant and flexible.

However, the defaults are tuned for local services. In this articles we’ll see how to tune and harden a Go server for Internet exposure.

https://blog.gopheracademy.com/advent-2016/exposing-go-on-the-internet/

What is Blockchain Technology? A Step-by-Step Guide For Beginners

Is blockchain technology the new internet?

The blockchain is an undeniably ingenious invention – the brainchild of a person or group of people known by the pseudonym Satoshi Nakamoto.

By allowing digital information to be distributed but not copied, blockchains create the backbone of a new type of internet. Originally devised for the digital currency, Bitcoin, the tech community is now finding other potential uses for the technology.

Bitcoin has been called “digital gold”, and for good reason. To date, the total value of currency is close to $9 billion US. And blockchains can make other types of digital value. Like the internet (or your car), you don’t need to know how the blockchain works to use it. However, having a basic knowledge of this new technology shows why it’s considered revolutionary.
What is Blockchain Technology? A step-by-step guide than anyone can understand

“The blockchain is an incorruptible digital ledger of economic transactions that can be programmed to record not just financial transactions but virtually everything of value.”

http://blockgeeks.com/guides/what-is-blockchain-technology-a-step-by-step-guide-than-anyone-can-understand/

Using Rowhammer bitflips to root Android phones is now a thing

Researchers have devised an attack that gains unfettered “root” access to a large number of Android phones, exploiting a relatively new type of bug that allows adversaries to manipulate data stored in memory chips.

The breakthrough has the potential to make millions of Android phones vulnerable, at least until a security fix is available, to a new form of attack that seizes control of core parts of the operating system and neuters key security defenses. Equally important, it demonstrates that the new class of exploit, dubbed Rowhammer, can have malicious and far-reaching effects on a much wider number of devices than was previously known, including those running ARM chips.

Previously, some experts believed Rowhammer attacks that altered specific pieces of security-sensitive data weren’t reliable enough to pose a viable threat because exploits depended on chance hardware faults or advanced memory-management features that could be easily adapted to repel the attacks. But the new proof-of-concept attack developed by an international team of academic researchers is challenging those assumptions.

An app containing the researchers’ rooting exploit requires no user permissions and doesn’t rely on any vulnerability in Android to work. Instead, their attack exploits a hardware vulnerability, using a Rowhammer exploit that alters crucial bits of data in a way that completely roots name brand Android devices from LG, Motorola, Samsung, OnePlus, and possibly other manufacturers.

 

http://arstechnica.com/security/2016/10/using-rowhammer-bitflips-to-root-android-phones-is-now-a-thing