In-depth: Functional programming in C++

In this reprinted #altdevblogaday in-depth piece, id Software co-founder and technical director John Carmack looks at the value in programming in a functional style with C++.
(old but gold)

https://www.gamasutra.com/view/news/169296/Indepth_Functional_programming_in_C.php

Advertisements

Why Discord is Sticking with React Native

Being one of the first apps built with React Native, we were excited to share our first year journey using React Native back in 2016.

Looking back at the past three years, React Native has proven to be extremely successful at Discord and helped drive our iOS user adoption from zero to millions!

More specifically, React Native has allowed us to reap the benefits of quickly leveraging reusable code across platforms, as well as develop a small and mighty team.

Meanwhile, we’ve learned to adapt to its inevitable pain points without sacrificing overall productivity.

https://blog.discordapp.com/why-discord-is-sticking-with-react-native-ccc34be0d427

Interactive: The Top Programming Languages 2018

This app ranks the popularity of dozens of programming languages. You can filter them by excluding sectors that aren’t relevant to you, such as “Web” or “Embedded.” (Which sectors a language can be found listed in is based on typical use patterns we’ve seen in the wild.) Rankings are created by weighting and combining 11 metrics from 9 sources. We have one less source this year, as the Dice job site shut down its API. However, the Dice metric is still available for previous years’ data. (Read more about our method and sources).

The default set of weights produces our IEEE Spectrum ranking—but there are preset weights for those more interested in what’s trending or most looked for by employers. Don’t like the presets? Create your own ranking by adjusting the weights yourself. To compare with a previous year’s data, click “Add a Comparison” and then click “Edit Ranking,” which will give you the option to compare with data from 2014 to 2017.

This app was originally developed in collaboration with IEEE Spectrum by data journalist Nick Diakopoulous.

https://spectrum.ieee.org/static/interactive-the-top-programming-languages-2018

Comprehensive Guide to Serverless Go with AWS Lambda

First, let’s have a quick look as to how software was traditionally built.
Web applications are deployed on web servers running on physical machines. As a software developer, you needed to to be aware of the intricacies of the server that runs your software.
To get your application running on the server, you had to spend hours downloading, compiling, installing, configuring, and connecting all sorts of components. The OS of your machines need to be constantly upgraded and patched for security vulnerabilities. In addition, servers need to be provisioned, load-balanced, configured, patched, and maintained.
In short, managing servers is a time-consuming task which often requires dedicated and experienced systems operations personnel.
What server maintenance can feel like – Metropolis (1927 film)
What is the point of software engineering? Contrary to what some might think, the goal of software engineering isn’t to deliver software. A software engineer’s job is to deliver value – to get the usefulness of software into the hands of users.
At the end of the day, you do need servers to deliver software. However, the time spent managing servers is time you could have spent on developing new features and improving your application. When you have a great idea, the last thing you want to do is set up infrastructure. Instead of worrying about servers, you want to focus more on shipping value.
How can we minimize the time required to deliver impact?

State of React Native 2018

It’s been a while since we last published a status update about React Native.

At Facebook, we’re using React Native more than ever and for many important projects. One of our most popular products is Marketplace, one of the top-level tabs in our app which is used by 800 million people each month. Since its creation in 2015, all of Marketplace has been built with React Native, including over a hundred full-screen views throughout different parts of the app.

https://facebook.github.io/react-native/blog/2018/06/14/state-of-react-native-2018

Python Application Layouts: A Reference

Python, though opinionated on syntax and style, is surprisingly flexible when it comes to structuring your applications.

On the one hand, this flexibility is great: it allows different use cases to use structures that are necessary for those use cases. On the other hand, though, it can be very confusing to the new developer.

The Internet isn’t a lot of help either—there are as many opinions as there are Python blogs. In this article, I want to give you a dependable Python application layout reference guide that you can refer to for the vast majority of your use cases.

You’ll see examples of common Python application structures, including command-line applications (CLI apps), one-off scripts, installable packages, and web application layouts with popular frameworks like Flask and Django.

Save yourself a lot of pain (and money) by choosing your AWS Region wisely

Choosing an AWS region is the first decision you have to make when you set up your AWS components. You can’t do anything in the AWS Management Console, SDK or CLI without choosing a region. Most AWS customers choose one based on proximity to themselves or to their end users, which sounds like a sensible thing to do.

However, proximity alone is not enough. There are a lot of other factors to consider when choosing a region. Since my goal is to make applications grow on AWS, I’m always looking for factors that will make a difference. For example, AWS cost, feature selection, as well as the speed and resiliency of your AWS components.

So let’s get started…

https://www.concurrencylabs.com/blog/choose-your-aws-region-wisely/